• How are modulators different in function from neurotransmitters?

    Best answer: They originate from the cell body vs presynaptic cleft for neurotransmitter. The are slow acting and effect last longer vs neurotransmitter are fast acting and quick.
    Best answer: They originate from the cell body vs presynaptic cleft for neurotransmitter. The are slow acting and effect last longer vs neurotransmitter are fast acting and quick.
    1 answer · Biology · 5 years ago
  • Is calcium chloride an electrolyte solution?

    Yes it turns into Ca 2+ and 2 Cl -
    Yes it turns into Ca 2+ and 2 Cl -
    8 answers · Biology · 5 years ago
  • Who knows hemophilia?

    Hemophilia A and B are X linked diseases. Hemo B and Hemo A are a loss a function mutation. But in Hemo A there can be an inversion on the X chromosome allowing it to interact with itself.
    Hemophilia A and B are X linked diseases. Hemo B and Hemo A are a loss a function mutation. But in Hemo A there can be an inversion on the X chromosome allowing it to interact with itself.
    5 answers · Biology · 5 years ago
  • Which of the following best describes what happens after a lysosome is made in the rough endoplasmic reticulum?

    4. Proteins need a specific tag M6P to designate its final destination/function this happens in the golgi.
    4. Proteins need a specific tag M6P to designate its final destination/function this happens in the golgi.
    3 answers · Biology · 5 years ago
  • Explain why action potentials move through axons in only one direction: away from the cell body, toward the?

    There are microtubule which help bring the action potential from the cell body to axon terminus. The microtubule have a protein called kinesin which bring vesicles to the positive end. Which happen to be a one way street to the axon terminus.
    There are microtubule which help bring the action potential from the cell body to axon terminus. The microtubule have a protein called kinesin which bring vesicles to the positive end. Which happen to be a one way street to the axon terminus.
    2 answers · Biology · 5 years ago
  • College Biology Help!!!!!!?

    Best answer: If there is a covalent bond then it would be harder to separate both strands for replication since all DNA Replication proteins do is disrupt hydrogen bonds. These interactions are weaker than covalent bonds. If a mutation occurs in the promoter than that gene will not be able to be transcribed. Transcription factors and RNA... show more
    Best answer: If there is a covalent bond then it would be harder to separate both strands for replication since all DNA Replication proteins do is disrupt hydrogen bonds. These interactions are weaker than covalent bonds. If a mutation occurs in the promoter than that gene will not be able to be transcribed. Transcription factors and RNA polymerase will not be able to carry out transcription. Just right the complementary to it but instead of A binding to T it will bind to U. So A H-bonds with T and C with G.
    1 answer · Biology · 5 years ago
  • Which macromoluce composes the majority of the cell membrane?

    Best answer: Phospholipids make up the plasma membrane. Additional structures are in the plasma membrane like protein and cholesterol but they are minor compared to the ratio to of phospholipids.
    Best answer: Phospholipids make up the plasma membrane. Additional structures are in the plasma membrane like protein and cholesterol but they are minor compared to the ratio to of phospholipids.
    2 answers · Biology · 5 years ago
  • Prokaryotic genes are POLYCISTRONIC, so, do they have terminator codons that punctuate each CISTRON?

    Best answer: Yes they are polycistronic genes. Like eukaryotes they have a stop codon. They have a release factor which has tRNA shape which force peptidyl transferase to add water instead of amino acid making translation complex unbind ending translation.
    Best answer: Yes they are polycistronic genes. Like eukaryotes they have a stop codon. They have a release factor which has tRNA shape which force peptidyl transferase to add water instead of amino acid making translation complex unbind ending translation.
    1 answer · Biology · 5 years ago
  • How does the misfolding of proteins cause sickle cell anemia?

    Best answer: A misfolding can occur by various mutations in the amino acid sequence. For example, normal hemoglobin contains amino acid Glutamic acid at position 6. In sickle cell anemia glutamic acid is substituted by amino acid valine. This dirsupts the protiens function caused by the misfold. It is important to note that primary structure affects... show more
    Best answer: A misfolding can occur by various mutations in the amino acid sequence. For example, normal hemoglobin contains amino acid Glutamic acid at position 6. In sickle cell anemia glutamic acid is substituted by amino acid valine. This dirsupts the protiens function caused by the misfold. It is important to note that primary structure affects tertiary structure and since hemoglobin is a quarternary structure the misfold will occur.
    1 answer · Biology · 6 years ago
  • Do carbohydrates attach to protein before it leaves the ER?

    Best answer: No post translational modification occur after it leaves rough ER. Packaging and modifying occurs in the Golgi apparatus.
    Best answer: No post translational modification occur after it leaves rough ER. Packaging and modifying occurs in the Golgi apparatus.
    1 answer · Biology · 5 years ago
  • What is the difference between prosthetic group and side chains on an enzyme?

    Prosthetic groups are non-protein molecules that are attached to a protein. An exapmle of a prosthetic group is the Heme group in myoglobin or hemoglobin. Whereas, a side chain is another amino acid attached at the peptide bond also known as a residue.
    Prosthetic groups are non-protein molecules that are attached to a protein. An exapmle of a prosthetic group is the Heme group in myoglobin or hemoglobin. Whereas, a side chain is another amino acid attached at the peptide bond also known as a residue.
    2 answers · Biology · 6 years ago
  • Do neuromodulators travel a longer or shorter distance than neurotransmitters, or is it the same?

    Best answer: Neuromodulators travel longer than neurotransmitters. This is due to the location they are synthesized. Nueromodulators are made in the cell soma/body and have to travel to the presynaptic terminal. Neurotransmitters are already located at the presynaptic terminal.
    Best answer: Neuromodulators travel longer than neurotransmitters. This is due to the location they are synthesized. Nueromodulators are made in the cell soma/body and have to travel to the presynaptic terminal. Neurotransmitters are already located at the presynaptic terminal.
    1 answer · Biology · 5 years ago
  • Protein Synthesis biology homework help? I don't understand transcription?

    Best answer: Ok I am going to give you the overall picture first. DNA makes RNA by a process called transcription RNA makes protein by a process called translation. In transcription you have a DNA sequence like above 3'TGTGCTCGA 5'. This sequence is going to be used as the template strand to make RNA by RNA polymerase. Therefore your... show more
    Best answer: Ok I am going to give you the overall picture first. DNA makes RNA by a process called transcription RNA makes protein by a process called translation. In transcription you have a DNA sequence like above 3'TGTGCTCGA 5'. This sequence is going to be used as the template strand to make RNA by RNA polymerase. Therefore your result will be 5'ACACGAGCU 3' this sequence you have transcribed is now called mRNA. Keep in. Mind when you deal with mRNA T nucleotide will now become U. Here every 3 nucleotide will code for an amino acid. So ACA, CGA, GCT will code for 3 different amino acids. Use and amino acid chart to figure out what these will code for. Each 3 nucleotide equal a codon. You have to use these codon to make protein with the help of tRNA. tRNA will have the anticodon to the codon. Lets say for example if you have a codon ACA then it's anti codon is UGU. In DNA replication or transcription you will always add nucleotide to a growing chain on the 3' OH end. Hope this helps! If you get a chance try some YouTube videos.
    1 answer · Biology · 5 years ago
  • Tay-Sachs disease often affects children by progressively destroying cells in their brains due to the accumula?

    Best answer: B. is due to the lysosome not having the proper enzyme to break down the fat therefore it will get tot the lysosome but just accumulate there.
    Best answer: B. is due to the lysosome not having the proper enzyme to break down the fat therefore it will get tot the lysosome but just accumulate there.
    2 answers · Biology · 5 years ago
  • What is the role of the plasma membrane in maintaining homeostasis in the cell?

    Plasma membrane is selective on what can come in and out. Therefore maintaining homeostasis.
    Plasma membrane is selective on what can come in and out. Therefore maintaining homeostasis.
    4 answers · Biology · 5 years ago
  • What cell parts carry materials between organelles such as the ER and the Golgi complex?

    C. Vesicles act as a taxi and transport protein from ER to Golgi
    C. Vesicles act as a taxi and transport protein from ER to Golgi
    3 answers · Biology · 5 years ago
  • What cellular structures consist of a phospohlipid bilayer?

    Plasma membrane, nuclear membrane, endoplasmic reticulum.
    Plasma membrane, nuclear membrane, endoplasmic reticulum.
    2 answers · Biology · 5 years ago
  • Which of the following can serve as vectors?

    Best answer: C. Both can serve as a vector. Basically all a vector is a vehicle to be able to carry the gene you want to a certain place or replicate it.
    Best answer: C. Both can serve as a vector. Basically all a vector is a vehicle to be able to carry the gene you want to a certain place or replicate it.
    2 answers · Biology · 5 years ago
  • Why do intestines have muscle layers? What are the main functions of the digestive system?

    Intestines job is for nutrients absorption in your diet. They have smooth muscles so the food can move throughout the small intestine to the large intestine and eventually out the anus.
    Intestines job is for nutrients absorption in your diet. They have smooth muscles so the food can move throughout the small intestine to the large intestine and eventually out the anus.
    5 answers · Biology · 5 years ago