• Can someone help me derive this monster function quick please!?

    Best answer: Rewrite it as: -5*x^(5.5)+(-5)*x^(-2.5) then -5*(x^(5.5)+x^(-2.5)) First derivative is easier, now! -5*(5.5*x^(4.5)-2.5*x(-3.5))
    Best answer: Rewrite it as: -5*x^(5.5)+(-5)*x^(-2.5) then -5*(x^(5.5)+x^(-2.5)) First derivative is easier, now! -5*(5.5*x^(4.5)-2.5*x(-3.5))
    3 answers · Mathematics · 9 years ago
  • I don't understand how to solve this problem?

    Is 3x+6 >= -9? Well, that happens when x+2 >= -3 (divide both sides by 3) Thus when x >= -5 (Subtract two from both sides.) As for the next one, 4x+2 >= -6, subtract two from both sides, then divide by 4 on both sides... The answer, of course, is x >= -2 will satisfy it
    Is 3x+6 >= -9? Well, that happens when x+2 >= -3 (divide both sides by 3) Thus when x >= -5 (Subtract two from both sides.) As for the next one, 4x+2 >= -6, subtract two from both sides, then divide by 4 on both sides... The answer, of course, is x >= -2 will satisfy it
    5 answers · Mathematics · 9 years ago
  • Calculus help plz?

    I presume you're meaning taking the square root of the square root of the square root of the square root of the square root of the... going on forever. This would be the limit, as n => infinity of x^((1/2)^n) If so, the limit is 1: the exponent goes (ultimately) to zero, and anything to the zero is 1. Now if it's successive... show more
    I presume you're meaning taking the square root of the square root of the square root of the square root of the square root of the... going on forever. This would be the limit, as n => infinity of x^((1/2)^n) If so, the limit is 1: the exponent goes (ultimately) to zero, and anything to the zero is 1. Now if it's successive powers of the square root of x, you get limit as n => infinity of (x^(1/2))^n = x^(n/2) Clearly, the exponent goes to infinity, so the limit must, for x>1, go to infinity, and for 0<X<1, to zero and for x=1 stays at one. Doesn't count (outside of complex math) for x<0 One of these has to be your answer.
    3 answers · Mathematics · 1 decade ago
  • Controlled group?

    Rach has it down pretty nicely: you do something to one or more groups, and have another group that you do nothing to (or, in medicine, appear to do something to but don't really, with it either a being a sham [e.g. a placebo or a known to be irrelevant chiropractic manipulation] or the usual and customary treatment). Now the reason is... show more
    Rach has it down pretty nicely: you do something to one or more groups, and have another group that you do nothing to (or, in medicine, appear to do something to but don't really, with it either a being a sham [e.g. a placebo or a known to be irrelevant chiropractic manipulation] or the usual and customary treatment). Now the reason is mathematical. In the real world, there are lots of variables that might affect the outcome of your experiment, but that you either cannot control, or cannot control for, or are totally unaware of. (Let us not kid ourselves, we don't know it all--not by a wide margin.) If you have a control group and an experimental group or groups, you can use the control group as an approximation of what would have "happened anyway" in your experiment, letting you tease out (roughly) the effect of whatever you did from what would have "happened anyway." The explanation is sloppy, but I think it makes reasonable sense. Well, it does to me, anyhow
    4 answers · Biology · 1 decade ago
  • Come on guys please help me out.... point me in the right direcition at least?

    Best answer: OK, on the whole, the folks in radiology (sometimes including the readiologist) are employed by the hospital; if the radiologist is not a formal employee of the hospital, he/she will probably be employed by a group of radiologists, or will be an independent contractor to the hospital. Either way, "X-Ray" (now more often known... show more
    Best answer: OK, on the whole, the folks in radiology (sometimes including the readiologist) are employed by the hospital; if the radiologist is not a formal employee of the hospital, he/she will probably be employed by a group of radiologists, or will be an independent contractor to the hospital. Either way, "X-Ray" (now more often known as "Diagnostic Imaging" since things other than X-rays are used to image things) tends to be a more or less autonomous department in the hospital, kind of self-contained. Rather than try to detail that further, you might start by asking who the X-Ray tech is responsible to; that would be one or more supervisors. Then, who the supers are answerable to, on and on until you get to the "top" of the heap. Then, take a look at how an X-ray gets ordered, done and read and the report generated, and look at who is responsible to whom. That should give you a good starting point, and frankly, if your buddy has been in an X-Ray department, he/she can ask a few of the folks he/she rubs elbows with, and you're off to a good start.
    1 answer · Medicine · 1 decade ago
  • Antibiotics(homework)?

    Well, let's see... Penicillin: Penicillium crysodigium, a mold. There are dozens of penicillin derivatives (ampicillin, amoxicillin, bacampacillin, carbenicillin, piperacillin, and a host of others) that are either produced by fermentation using appropriate substrates for P. crysodigium to turn into a penicillin analogue, or by chemical... show more
    Well, let's see... Penicillin: Penicillium crysodigium, a mold. There are dozens of penicillin derivatives (ampicillin, amoxicillin, bacampacillin, carbenicillin, piperacillin, and a host of others) that are either produced by fermentation using appropriate substrates for P. crysodigium to turn into a penicillin analogue, or by chemical modification of the basic structure. Cephalosporins: Genus Cephalosporium; I forget the species. Isolated from a sample of sewage from Sardinia. ALL cephalosporins are chemical modifications of the native molecule; the technology producing the first usable cephalosporin (Keflin; it was IV only. Keflex was the first oral one. Others cephalosporins include claforan, omnicef, ancef, spectracef... and lots of others...) was developed by Eli Lilly and company when Glaxo (the company that found the stuff, and realized it was horribly toxic in its native state) couldn't whip the process. Macrolides: Erythromycin, clindamycin, lincomycin, darithromycin, clarithromycin, and others. Chemical modifications of a basic structure that I think was bacterial in origin. Aminoglycosides: Bacterial origin, I think. Gentamicin, netilmycin, tobramicin and others. Terribly toxic, and not used a lot. Tetracyclines: Don't recall, but I think these were bacterial too. Dozens of variants on the initial tetracycline molecule: minocycline, oxytetracycline, chlortetracycline, doxycycline and others. Again, all chemical modifications of the initial structure Sulfonamides: Totally synthetic. There's dozens of 'em! Sticks in my craw we just stumbled over the basic structure then elaborated on it. Trimethoprim: Totally synthetic. It was designed to inhibit a particular enzyme unique to bacteria Floroquinolones: Totally synthetic. Ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, gatafloxicin, moxifloxicin, and others. This one is a "designer" antibiotic, too; DNA gyrase from bacteria (there are lots of different kinds, almost one for every species) was isolated and characterized and the molecule was designed to inhibit it. Turns out that a lot of them inhibit topoisomerase 4, too. There are other groups, but this should get you up and flying. If you want some real deep goodies, go to the library and check out Goodman and Gilman's textbook on pharmacology. It's huge, and it'll give you more than you'd ever want...
    4 answers · Medicine · 1 decade ago
  • Would you Consider the Terrorists "Sophisticated', Like Bush Would Like you Believe?

    Personally, I don't claim to have any insight into Bush's mind, or that of another. I have no idea what Bush wants me to believe; all I have is what the press reports concerning things, which may or may not accurately represent reality on this, as on any other, point. As to how sophisticated terrorists are, let us not kid ourselves, many... show more
    Personally, I don't claim to have any insight into Bush's mind, or that of another. I have no idea what Bush wants me to believe; all I have is what the press reports concerning things, which may or may not accurately represent reality on this, as on any other, point. As to how sophisticated terrorists are, let us not kid ourselves, many of them have received good educations, and there is no evidence that willingness to resort to violence to get your way is genetically tied to lack of intelligence. To have eluded capture as long as the surviving terrorists have is indicative of considerable resourcefulness and cleverness at keeping out of the hands of the officials looking for them. Try not paying a couple of bills for a while and see how good you are at evading a skip tracer or a repo man, folks, and I'm sure you'll get my point pretty quickly. Certainly they have shown considerable cleverness in the 9/11/2001 event. Some of their more recent attempts make me wonder if their best minds are gone, but more likely it represents the fact that you can't plan something like this without leaving tracks, and they're being tracked by the intelligence equivalent of superb blood-hounds. Sophisticated:? As much, I'd say, as most of us on Yahoo Answers, and more than most of the folk I've seen produce answers here. As sharp as the top answerers here? I should think most of them are not. Again, remember, in a terrorist organization (like any other) the majority of the members are just muscle to get things done; you only need a small handful of really, really sharp people to do the planning.
    10 answers · Government · 1 decade ago
  • I Just Saw an Ad for LOReal Skin Care With "Pro-Calcium" (Whatever that Means)-?

    Pro-Calcium: This is the opposite of Amateur-Calcium, isn't it? OK, what this represents is the gullibility of the consumer being exploited by claims that sound scientific... Pro-calcium... Sigh. This is what we get for allowing science education to lag behind sex education in emphasis and funding...
    Pro-Calcium: This is the opposite of Amateur-Calcium, isn't it? OK, what this represents is the gullibility of the consumer being exploited by claims that sound scientific... Pro-calcium... Sigh. This is what we get for allowing science education to lag behind sex education in emphasis and funding...
    7 answers · Makeup · 1 decade ago
  • The David Vitter Thing: Under What Circumstances is it Appropriate to Be "Intolerant of Intolerance"?

    Although I would never be willing to claim that the end justifies the means, I would suggest that looking at the end point of the intolerance might be prudent. I have little patience with those who reject others simply because they are different, when the difference has little or no real significance. I am, therefore, intolerant of racism, for... show more
    Although I would never be willing to claim that the end justifies the means, I would suggest that looking at the end point of the intolerance might be prudent. I have little patience with those who reject others simply because they are different, when the difference has little or no real significance. I am, therefore, intolerant of racism, for instance; to deny someone a job, even though the individual is well qualified for the job, and the best candidate that has applied for the job, simply because you don't like their ethnic grouping (no matter what the ethnic grouping) is irrational. I do not tolerate that sort of thing well and feel that such behavior merits intolerance. Other examples should spring to mind. Intolerance should, however, be celebrated in some contexts. 1+1=2 in every system but binary. Sorry, folks, but I'm totally intolerant of saying that 1+1=3 for large values of 1 and small values of three. It just doesn't; somewhere in this answers file, I mathematically proved 1+1=2, as I recall it. (Or was it 2+2=4? Whatever!) Where the intolerance is focused on rigidly saying that which is, is and that which is not, is not--well, gosh, I want that sort of intolerance in the engineering team that designs and the construction team that builds the airplane I fly on!!! And that builds the skyscrapers I'm standing in, and that engineers the elevators I ride on, and... Enough said! Again, that's a results based thing. If the intolerance demonstrated demonstrably generates harm, it probably deserves to experience intolerance. If it promotes the good (as, for instance, in saying that the right answer to a multiplication problem is the right answer and not tolerating wrong answers), intolerance deserves toleration. Of couse the sticky bit is that ther is a lot of life where we're not able to demonstrate the results of the intolerance, or where opinions about its result differ, or where people differ about what is or is not true. I make no bones about the fact that there is grey out there in life, and the fact that my answer is very much black and white based. For those areas where life is grey, my personal preference is to continue to labor to shed light on the issue until I can resolve it into multiple smaller issues that are closer to black and white, or into a single black and white issue. Some issues may never get there (Taste in clothes is a quick example) but I can live with that...
    9 answers · Philosophy · 1 decade ago
  • IS EITHER MATH Problem CORRECT?PLZ JUST SAY YES OR No OR WHAT I DID WRONG! PLZ DONT GIVE ME THE CORRECT ANSWER

    Neither answer seems right to me. Not seeing how you did your manipulations of the symbols, I'm not sure how you erred. I shall not give you the answer I arrived at, but I double checked it through MATHCad, a symbolic mathematics program I'm fortunate enough to have.... It didn't get what you got, either.
    Neither answer seems right to me. Not seeing how you did your manipulations of the symbols, I'm not sure how you erred. I shall not give you the answer I arrived at, but I double checked it through MATHCad, a symbolic mathematics program I'm fortunate enough to have.... It didn't get what you got, either.
    10 answers · Mathematics · 1 decade ago
  • Why do the law inforcment that out killers to death have to use sterrel needles and antiseptic?

    Mainly, it's an availability thing. The IV needles and solutions and all that are used are "off the shelf" single use items that are available in any hospital setting; it's cheaper to buy them that way, because of the huge quantities produced for the medical industry. So, where are you going to get non-sterile stuff... show more
    Mainly, it's an availability thing. The IV needles and solutions and all that are used are "off the shelf" single use items that are available in any hospital setting; it's cheaper to buy them that way, because of the huge quantities produced for the medical industry. So, where are you going to get non-sterile stuff from? Secondarily, it's for the protection of the individual starting the IV line: there is only one person to whom harm is intended, the individual sentenced to be executed. No sense allowing the individual assigned the task of carrying out the state's decree risking stabbing themselves and picking up something nasty. Makes sense when you see it from that point of view... You just need the broader perspective.
    3 answers · Medicine · 1 decade ago
  • I found a pill called Ismelin.. what is it for?

    Best answer: Ismelin is an utterly obsolete medication for high blood pressure. It's so old that I don't even recall prescribing it... I didn't know that branded Ismelin was even produced anymore. One pill? That's not going to do anything much in terms of intoxicating effects. I don't recall that Ismelin had any major... show more
    Best answer: Ismelin is an utterly obsolete medication for high blood pressure. It's so old that I don't even recall prescribing it... I didn't know that branded Ismelin was even produced anymore. One pill? That's not going to do anything much in terms of intoxicating effects. I don't recall that Ismelin had any major psychotropic activity, but it's been every bit of twenty years since I've heard the name, maybe more.
    4 answers · Medicine · 1 decade ago
  • Math questions?

    I wonder what you'd get for: 2x3^(3+4) and (2*3)^(3+4) Um, I actually know, and I think I may have helped a bit...
    I wonder what you'd get for: 2x3^(3+4) and (2*3)^(3+4) Um, I actually know, and I think I may have helped a bit...
    4 answers · Mathematics · 1 decade ago
  • Have any health care provider had economic difficulty or even closed?

    Best answer: Over the years I've been in practice, I've seen physicians go bankrupt and pharmacies go under. Although it's before my time, hospitals have gone baknrupt, too, and some of the health maintainence organizations that were formed in the earlier days of HMO/PPO formation went belly up. Saw a rather large, multi-specialty... show more
    Best answer: Over the years I've been in practice, I've seen physicians go bankrupt and pharmacies go under. Although it's before my time, hospitals have gone baknrupt, too, and some of the health maintainence organizations that were formed in the earlier days of HMO/PPO formation went belly up. Saw a rather large, multi-specialty clinic go under around here, oh, about ten or fifteen years ago. The individual physicians were able to salvage things for themselves without going insolvent, but the corporation that "owned" the clinic went bankrupt. As to economic difficulty, all of them have it from time to time, and at this point in time, as third party payer and Medicare/Medicaid reimbursement is getting tighter, but costs are getting higher (for supplies, for competant personnel, for durable goods, etc), more and more hospitals are struggling to keep afloat. Bit of a rambling answer, when the basic answer is YES!!!!!
    4 answers · Medicine · 1 decade ago
  • To mu previous question "1 mile equals 1609 meter :express this in scientific notation" why cant the answer

    Best answer: It is a simple notational convention. Scientific notation has only one digit to the left of the decimal, and by convention that digit is nonzero. Sound arbitrary? It is. But that's the way it's done.
    Best answer: It is a simple notational convention. Scientific notation has only one digit to the left of the decimal, and by convention that digit is nonzero. Sound arbitrary? It is. But that's the way it's done.
    3 answers · Mathematics · 1 decade ago
  • Math question again?

    The range is 0 <= x <= 5 The function is x^2+1 so it will grow across the whole interval, hitting its minimum at x = 0 and its maximum at x = 5. It'll hit everything between the minimum and the maximum. SO, if I have range and domain correct, your domain is 0^2 + 1 <= y <= 5^2 + 1 or 1 <= y <= 26 Life gets more... show more
    The range is 0 <= x <= 5 The function is x^2+1 so it will grow across the whole interval, hitting its minimum at x = 0 and its maximum at x = 5. It'll hit everything between the minimum and the maximum. SO, if I have range and domain correct, your domain is 0^2 + 1 <= y <= 5^2 + 1 or 1 <= y <= 26 Life gets more complicated if the function is not strictly monotonic...
    2 answers · Mathematics · 1 decade ago
  • Can gatorade be used instead of iv fluid?

    I wouldn't recommend it, though I've heard of weirder things being given intravenously... Stuff isn't sterile, to begin with, and it's not isotonic, which means that the red cells might be damaged severely at the site of infusion (although at high enough blood flow rates, it sometimes doesn't matter as much: that'd be with a... show more
    I wouldn't recommend it, though I've heard of weirder things being given intravenously... Stuff isn't sterile, to begin with, and it's not isotonic, which means that the red cells might be damaged severely at the site of infusion (although at high enough blood flow rates, it sometimes doesn't matter as much: that'd be with a central line...) IV fluids are NOT always saline, by the way.... D5W is used, for instance, and that's just water with d-glucose in it. Weirdest thing I've ever heard IV: the fluid from the inside of a coconut. Early in the coconut's development, it's just a sterile electrolyte solution, and believe it or not, it was successfully used as an IV fluid... with the individuals receiving it surviving. Go figure. If you sterilized the Gatorade, and diluted it to isotonic concentration, you might get away with it, BUT there are flavoring agents and preservatives and all that jazz that might have toxic or allergic effects. As someone else commented, it's not intended for IV use, and the preservatives, flavorings and all that don't have to be safe for IV use, and probably aren't.
    7 answers · Medicine · 1 decade ago
  • Do you think that medical companies?

    Whether they should or shouldn't direct-to-consumer medical ads are here to stay, I'm afraid. My experience, as a physician, with this sort of thing is that it doesn't really create much in terms of hypochondriacs; it's the INTERNET that does that. (That is not a joke, either.) It does create demand for drugs, sometimes... show more
    Whether they should or shouldn't direct-to-consumer medical ads are here to stay, I'm afraid. My experience, as a physician, with this sort of thing is that it doesn't really create much in terms of hypochondriacs; it's the INTERNET that does that. (That is not a joke, either.) It does create demand for drugs, sometimes inappropriately, but since the prescription has to come from a licensed independent medical practitioner, if it's not needed, it'll probably not get written. The good side to it is that people are made aware of alternative treatments, and made aware of treatments for previously untreatable conditions. With the speed with which medicine is changing, now, keeping up is an appallingly difficult task, and if you don't have much contact with the representatives of the pharmaceutical firms out there (and increasingly large numbers of physicians refuse to see them these days), it can be a major challenge to know what's been recently released. Personally, I don't care for it, but it is not without its benefits to the patient and the physician both. And its harm.
    3 answers · Medicine · 1 decade ago
  • Would you Consider Many Abuses of Power, a "High Crime"?

    Much, I suspect, depends on the particular abuses. Enjoying free food from people who are trying to influence your opinion, because you are a person whose power affects the server's good is an abuse of power, but I'd hardly consider that a high crime. OK, with what I weigh, maybe my taking chocolates would be a crime, but not a high... show more
    Much, I suspect, depends on the particular abuses. Enjoying free food from people who are trying to influence your opinion, because you are a person whose power affects the server's good is an abuse of power, but I'd hardly consider that a high crime. OK, with what I weigh, maybe my taking chocolates would be a crime, but not a high one. Conversely, using your position of power to (say) arrange for the death or disgrace of an opponent--that's a high crime, as far as I see it. Power, after all, can be abused in many ways... None of them would be a good thing, but some are, from the human standpoint, less horrid than others. From the Divine standpoint, as someone pointed out, abuse of power is a sin, and all sin is infinitely abhorrent to God, but I believe the context here is the human perspective...
    12 answers · Law & Ethics · 1 decade ago
  • Should people With RLS Symptoms Ever Be Treated for RLS, if they Have no Genetic Predisposition?

    Best answer: On the whole, once restless leg syndrome becomes symptomatic enough, it merits treatment. Remember, RLS is more than just an annoyance when you're awake; it can, and does, often disturb sleep sufficiently to induce daytime drowsiness, or impair ability to react to a rapidly changing situation--like driving in busy... show more
    Best answer: On the whole, once restless leg syndrome becomes symptomatic enough, it merits treatment. Remember, RLS is more than just an annoyance when you're awake; it can, and does, often disturb sleep sufficiently to induce daytime drowsiness, or impair ability to react to a rapidly changing situation--like driving in busy traffic. Genetic disposition or not, once the disease begins to cause significant interference with activities of daily living, treatment needs considered. Here, as with all other disease processes, the potential risks must be carefully weighed against the expected benefits, and the risk vs. benefit evaluation merits periodic reassessment.
    4 answers · Medicine · 1 decade ago