• Can someone help me derive this monster function quick please!?

    Best answer: Rewrite it as: -5*x^(5.5)+(-5)*x^(-2.5) then -5*(x^(5.5)+x^(-2.5)) First derivative is easier, now! -5*(5.5*x^(4.5)-2.5*x(-3.5))
    Best answer: Rewrite it as: -5*x^(5.5)+(-5)*x^(-2.5) then -5*(x^(5.5)+x^(-2.5)) First derivative is easier, now! -5*(5.5*x^(4.5)-2.5*x(-3.5))
    3 answers · Mathematics · 9 years ago
  • To mu previous question "1 mile equals 1609 meter :express this in scientific notation" why cant the answer

    Best answer: It is a simple notational convention. Scientific notation has only one digit to the left of the decimal, and by convention that digit is nonzero. Sound arbitrary? It is. But that's the way it's done.
    Best answer: It is a simple notational convention. Scientific notation has only one digit to the left of the decimal, and by convention that digit is nonzero. Sound arbitrary? It is. But that's the way it's done.
    3 answers · Mathematics · 1 decade ago
  • Doctor in the HOUSE!?

    Best answer: OK, ER Doc + Surgeon = Trauma Surgeon. You go into surgery, then do advanced work in trauma surgery. How many years? It's been a while since I looked at that, but somewhere in the 7-10 years range after medical school, which is usually about 4 years after premed which is about 4 years. Add it all up, that's about 15-18... show more
    Best answer: OK, ER Doc + Surgeon = Trauma Surgeon. You go into surgery, then do advanced work in trauma surgery. How many years? It's been a while since I looked at that, but somewhere in the 7-10 years range after medical school, which is usually about 4 years after premed which is about 4 years. Add it all up, that's about 15-18 years post-highschool.
    6 answers · Medicine · 1 decade ago
  • I Just Saw an Ad, Advocating that people Become More Active In their Health Care, In Particular, Questions-?

    Best answer: Oh, there will be several results, actually; in a quarter century of practicing medicine, I've watched the growth of the individual becoming more active in their health care, and these are not projections: they're what I've seen happen... *Some people will take the time and effort to make sure that the medical regimen, be... show more
    Best answer: Oh, there will be several results, actually; in a quarter century of practicing medicine, I've watched the growth of the individual becoming more active in their health care, and these are not projections: they're what I've seen happen... *Some people will take the time and effort to make sure that the medical regimen, be it drugs or physical therapy, or whatever, doesn't interfere with other prescribed remedies; this is going to be a good thing, because people don't always level with any given doctor about what all they're taking and doing. It's not malicious--it's just forgetfulness. *Some people will do some elementary preliminary checking on possible causes (primarily on the internet, and by the way in YAHOO Answers...), and will prompt physicians to check out-of-the-ordinary things that may need checked. This will be a mixed blessing, of course: sometimes, there is good reason not to check it (like strong evidence that it's absent) and it'll get checked anyhow. However, the lady with hematuria without signs of infection might tell me she's been in Japan, so I should check for Schistosoma japonicum--a parasite that you can't get here, but you CAN get in Japan, and that causes (sometimes) hematuria... *Some people will get so wrapped up in being active in their own medical care that they'll come in to the physician having made their diagnosis already (Many of the times I've endured this, the diagnosis has been demonstrated to be wrong: like about 2/3 of the time), decided what they want for treatment (not always the best choice, even if their diagnosis is right), and insistant that they get the diagnosis and treatment they want without further examination, etc. They'll argue until they get what they have decided they want. Last one that told me the Internet said he had thus-and-so, and he needed this specific drug got told that he should have the Internet prescribe the drug and absorb the malpractice risk of doing so, because I disagreed and wasn't going there. I did not make a friend on that one, I regret to say. *Some people will scare themselves silly. Of this, I see a surprisingly small amount. *A lot of people will come in already educated about the right disease process, and I can talk to them on a more sophisticated, more precise level. Oh, the joy of it all!!! Or they will come in, asking insightful questions, looking for comprehensible answers in lay terms. Ya GOTTA love that! Well, I do, anyhow. *MOST people will remain more or less passive. I'm not totally into that; I'd rather the patient and I worked as a collaborative team, you understand. That's the gist of it. It's nowhere that simple--some people are in multiple groups, and I've sure not exhausted the listing of what I've seen--but it's a good start for thinking about the subject.
    3 answers · Medicine · 1 decade ago
  • Two math questions?

    Best answer: Zingers is something made up for the problem; it looks like all the zingers have a remainder of 1 when divided by eight, so I'd go for 49 and 65, and any one of the list that has a remainder of one divided by 8 that I've missed. As for the string, ignore the width of the string. 4 times around the cylinder would be 64 cm... show more
    Best answer: Zingers is something made up for the problem; it looks like all the zingers have a remainder of 1 when divided by eight, so I'd go for 49 and 65, and any one of the list that has a remainder of one divided by 8 that I've missed. As for the string, ignore the width of the string. 4 times around the cylinder would be 64 cm length (4*64) and its ends touch top and bottom, so that adds 48 more cm, giving you a net length of 112 cm. Simple?
    2 answers · Mathematics · 1 decade ago
  • What should i do to pass a drug test?

    Best answer: Basically, there's no beating the test. The main active ingredient in weed is delta 9 tetrahydrocannabinol, which is somewhat fat soluable: it gets into large volumes of your body, and slowly leaches back into your bloodstream. Its two measured metabolites, nor-delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol carboxylic acid and... show more
    Best answer: Basically, there's no beating the test. The main active ingredient in weed is delta 9 tetrahydrocannabinol, which is somewhat fat soluable: it gets into large volumes of your body, and slowly leaches back into your bloodstream. Its two measured metabolites, nor-delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol carboxylic acid and delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol carboxylic acid do the same thing. If you get enough weed on board to get high, you will potentially have levels of THC, nor-THC-COOH and THC-COOH in your urine that the drug screen will detect for about a month. There are mountains of things on the internet that claim to make you super clean; all of them are either ineffective, or detected on the integrity tests. So, the only answer is to knock off the weed for at least 30 days, and hope that the stuff has cleared your system. Sorry!
    6 answers · Medicine · 1 decade ago
  • Come on guys please help me out.... point me in the right direcition at least?

    Best answer: OK, on the whole, the folks in radiology (sometimes including the readiologist) are employed by the hospital; if the radiologist is not a formal employee of the hospital, he/she will probably be employed by a group of radiologists, or will be an independent contractor to the hospital. Either way, "X-Ray" (now more often known... show more
    Best answer: OK, on the whole, the folks in radiology (sometimes including the readiologist) are employed by the hospital; if the radiologist is not a formal employee of the hospital, he/she will probably be employed by a group of radiologists, or will be an independent contractor to the hospital. Either way, "X-Ray" (now more often known as "Diagnostic Imaging" since things other than X-rays are used to image things) tends to be a more or less autonomous department in the hospital, kind of self-contained. Rather than try to detail that further, you might start by asking who the X-Ray tech is responsible to; that would be one or more supervisors. Then, who the supers are answerable to, on and on until you get to the "top" of the heap. Then, take a look at how an X-ray gets ordered, done and read and the report generated, and look at who is responsible to whom. That should give you a good starting point, and frankly, if your buddy has been in an X-Ray department, he/she can ask a few of the folks he/she rubs elbows with, and you're off to a good start.
    1 answer · Medicine · 1 decade ago
  • Have any health care provider had economic difficulty or even closed?

    Best answer: Over the years I've been in practice, I've seen physicians go bankrupt and pharmacies go under. Although it's before my time, hospitals have gone baknrupt, too, and some of the health maintainence organizations that were formed in the earlier days of HMO/PPO formation went belly up. Saw a rather large, multi-specialty... show more
    Best answer: Over the years I've been in practice, I've seen physicians go bankrupt and pharmacies go under. Although it's before my time, hospitals have gone baknrupt, too, and some of the health maintainence organizations that were formed in the earlier days of HMO/PPO formation went belly up. Saw a rather large, multi-specialty clinic go under around here, oh, about ten or fifteen years ago. The individual physicians were able to salvage things for themselves without going insolvent, but the corporation that "owned" the clinic went bankrupt. As to economic difficulty, all of them have it from time to time, and at this point in time, as third party payer and Medicare/Medicaid reimbursement is getting tighter, but costs are getting higher (for supplies, for competant personnel, for durable goods, etc), more and more hospitals are struggling to keep afloat. Bit of a rambling answer, when the basic answer is YES!!!!!
    4 answers · Medicine · 1 decade ago
  • I found a pill called Ismelin.. what is it for?

    Best answer: Ismelin is an utterly obsolete medication for high blood pressure. It's so old that I don't even recall prescribing it... I didn't know that branded Ismelin was even produced anymore. One pill? That's not going to do anything much in terms of intoxicating effects. I don't recall that Ismelin had any major... show more
    Best answer: Ismelin is an utterly obsolete medication for high blood pressure. It's so old that I don't even recall prescribing it... I didn't know that branded Ismelin was even produced anymore. One pill? That's not going to do anything much in terms of intoxicating effects. I don't recall that Ismelin had any major psychotropic activity, but it's been every bit of twenty years since I've heard the name, maybe more.
    4 answers · Medicine · 1 decade ago
  • Should people With RLS Symptoms Ever Be Treated for RLS, if they Have no Genetic Predisposition?

    Best answer: On the whole, once restless leg syndrome becomes symptomatic enough, it merits treatment. Remember, RLS is more than just an annoyance when you're awake; it can, and does, often disturb sleep sufficiently to induce daytime drowsiness, or impair ability to react to a rapidly changing situation--like driving in busy... show more
    Best answer: On the whole, once restless leg syndrome becomes symptomatic enough, it merits treatment. Remember, RLS is more than just an annoyance when you're awake; it can, and does, often disturb sleep sufficiently to induce daytime drowsiness, or impair ability to react to a rapidly changing situation--like driving in busy traffic. Genetic disposition or not, once the disease begins to cause significant interference with activities of daily living, treatment needs considered. Here, as with all other disease processes, the potential risks must be carefully weighed against the expected benefits, and the risk vs. benefit evaluation merits periodic reassessment.
    4 answers · Medicine · 1 decade ago
  • How come trauma surgeons study so much?

    Best answer: The same reason why other doctors study so much, to be honest. The field is a rapidly changing one: new approaches to old problems are found, and shown to be faster or better (hopefully both!) at rescuing the person injured; new tricks for finding hidden problems are found, and can be lifesaving. The bottom line is that a trauma... show more
    Best answer: The same reason why other doctors study so much, to be honest. The field is a rapidly changing one: new approaches to old problems are found, and shown to be faster or better (hopefully both!) at rescuing the person injured; new tricks for finding hidden problems are found, and can be lifesaving. The bottom line is that a trauma surgeon has to be as (pardon the pun) cutting edge with things as possible, because time is survival for the major trauma case, and if you can learn a new trick to save a little time, it may make the difference between life and death for the next person you're called to see. To a lesser degree, this is also true of every physician; I usually log between 50 and 100 hours of self-education a year, just to keep up, and I do a lot of un-logged hours of self-education every year on top of that. As an aside, there are several states that require a minimum number of hours of additional education every year be documented (education that meets particular standards, by the way) by every physician that wants tomaintain licensure to practice medicine in the state--here in the USA, anyhow. That drives some of the hours of continuing medical education. Oh, and one more reason: doctors that are worth their salt are fascinated by what we do; we're always trying to stuff a little more in our heads, out of the sheer delight of learning more about a discipline that fascinates us, and that is, in many ways, almost the definition of who we are as people. Go figure!
    6 answers · Medicine · 1 decade ago
  • Help with cushing's from people that understand?

    Best answer: Cushings Syndrome is an overproduction of cortisone by the adrenal glands. Getting appropriate treatment will go a long way to helping you handle the problem; usually, the trick is to figure out whether you have a tumor sending the adrenals into hyperdrive, so to speak, or whether your adrenals are just hyperactive. On the whole, the... show more
    Best answer: Cushings Syndrome is an overproduction of cortisone by the adrenal glands. Getting appropriate treatment will go a long way to helping you handle the problem; usually, the trick is to figure out whether you have a tumor sending the adrenals into hyperdrive, so to speak, or whether your adrenals are just hyperactive. On the whole, the traditional treatment has been surgical--removing the tumor, if there is one, or removing a portion of the adrenal glands otherwise. Sigh, some of us doctors remember Cushing's Syndrome without having to look it up, by the way. I'm one...
    3 answers · Medicine · 1 decade ago
  • Brain anoxia and reperfusion iojury?

    Best answer: Convulsions, or seizures, are generated by sustained, uncontrolled, inappropriate electrical activity of the brain. On the whole, you're not going to get a whole lot of that in an ischemic episode: no oxygen, no conversion of glucose (or other molecules) to energy, no sustained electrical activity. No sustained, uncontrolled,... show more
    Best answer: Convulsions, or seizures, are generated by sustained, uncontrolled, inappropriate electrical activity of the brain. On the whole, you're not going to get a whole lot of that in an ischemic episode: no oxygen, no conversion of glucose (or other molecules) to energy, no sustained electrical activity. No sustained, uncontrolled, abnormal electrical activity, no seizure. Hardly that simple, but hey, it's pretty close. What the anoxia (and hypoxia, in the penumbra, or rim, of inadequately perfused tissue around the stuff that isn't getting anything) does is trigger the release of compounds that try to cause an increase in the local blood flow. (A lot of these compounds are pre-formed and stored, requiring little or no energy use to release) The same thing is going to happen with ischemia that doesn't progress to frank anoxia. When the circulation gets back to normal (for whatever reason) these chemicals are going to cause a massive delivery of oxygen to the cells. One of the major events is a sudden calcium influx into the neurons--which can kill the neuron. Dead neuron equals no significant electrical activity in the neuron; go figure. The consumption of the glutamate generates chemical byproducts that can be irritating, and there are highly oxidizing compounds produced during the re-oxygenation, but again, these damage neurons rather than generate bizarre electrical activity. I've been at, oh, something over 200 cardiac arrests; people don't seize because there just isn't enough blood flow to produce the seizure activity--either at the brain level, or at the muscular level, frankly. Believe me, in over 200 cardiac arrests, I've never seen one seize. No one I know has ever seen it, either, except when the seizure (or its cause) causes the cardiac arrest... I think I've given you the information you've missed: seizure activity takes energy, and in a cardiac arrest, there's pretty well not enough of it to drive the activity. Hope that helps
    2 answers · Medicine · 1 decade ago
  • Will capitalism affect the curing of certain diseases such as cnacer and ads?

    Best answer: Yes, frankly, it will. It will make them possible. As it turns out, the AMA hasn't suppressed any cures of anything--read that, cures that really do work. What it suppresses are quack cures, causing the quacks to augment their income and their visibility by making unsubstantiated claims that their "cure" is being... show more
    Best answer: Yes, frankly, it will. It will make them possible. As it turns out, the AMA hasn't suppressed any cures of anything--read that, cures that really do work. What it suppresses are quack cures, causing the quacks to augment their income and their visibility by making unsubstantiated claims that their "cure" is being suppressed by the AMA to bolster the riches of the medical industry. Capitalism not only provides the funding for developing the tools to cure diseases, it motivates it. Let us not kid ourselves, here: if you've got the cure for something, you're going to make a bundle off it, using the legitimate structure of the current medical system. What, you say, of the cures found outside the system? Chuckle--I rememeber a lot of 'em. They all got ditched when someone (inside the system) found something that really worked for the disease process, or when grieving families realized that the cure wasn't working and publicized the fakery widely enough. So, yes, Capitalism will affect the curing of all sorts of diseases--it will continue to drive the search for the cures, and will continue to find the cures.
    3 answers · Medicine · 1 decade ago
  • Word problems are hard for me. Please help!?

    Best answer: You have 50 ounces of the alloy, of which x ounces are pure gold. Thus, how much of the $150 per ounce alloy have you? Why, 50-x ounces. Now, you're going to invest 400*x + 150*(50-x) to make this alloy. It's going to be at $250 an ounce, so make your life easy and say that: (400x+150(50-x))/50 = 250 Clean that up:... show more
    Best answer: You have 50 ounces of the alloy, of which x ounces are pure gold. Thus, how much of the $150 per ounce alloy have you? Why, 50-x ounces. Now, you're going to invest 400*x + 150*(50-x) to make this alloy. It's going to be at $250 an ounce, so make your life easy and say that: (400x+150(50-x))/50 = 250 Clean that up: factor out the fifty on the left... 8 x + 3(50-x) = 250 8x + 150 - 3x = 250 5x = 100 x = 20 and thus, 20 ounces of the pure gold, 30 ounces of the alloy. Check: 20*400 + 30* 150 = 8000 + 4500 = 12500 12500/50 = 250 Yep! It works. The trick, so to speak, is to see how to take what you know and to reduce it to a series of mathematical representations that you can make into a solvable relationship... Practice is the thing you need to do it well
    5 answers · Mathematics · 1 decade ago
  • Give me lots of info on Pascel's triangle.?

    Best answer: Described by Blaise Pascal, it is a method of computing the binomial coefficients. The triangle looks like this--if the machine will cooperate: 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 3 3 1 1 4 6 4 1 And so forth. There are reams of relationships between these coefficients--whole... show more
    Best answer: Described by Blaise Pascal, it is a method of computing the binomial coefficients. The triangle looks like this--if the machine will cooperate: 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 3 3 1 1 4 6 4 1 And so forth. There are reams of relationships between these coefficients--whole books have been written on on them. Let B(n,a) be the Binomial coefficient equivalent to entry a on row n (counting the first row as the zeroth row). B(n,a) = B(n-1,a)+B(n-1,a-1) = n!/(a!(n-a)!) Of course, these are the coefficients of the power of x in the polynomial expansion of: (x+1)^n = B(n,0)*x^n + B(n,1)*x^(n-1)+ ... + B(n,n-1)*x^1+B(n,0)*x^0 Others will give you longer answers, I'm sure--ripped out of wikipedia or something, but this is the gist of it.
    3 answers · Mathematics · 1 decade ago
  • How is an internal medicine doctor different from a general or family practioner?

    Best answer: I was trained as a Family Practitioner. When I completed my residency, I was setting fractures, doing surgery, delivering babies, taking care of newborns, taking care of children and adults--frankly, I was doing about everything. Now a general practitioner did the same thing, at one time--but as specialists came into the picture,... show more
    Best answer: I was trained as a Family Practitioner. When I completed my residency, I was setting fractures, doing surgery, delivering babies, taking care of newborns, taking care of children and adults--frankly, I was doing about everything. Now a general practitioner did the same thing, at one time--but as specialists came into the picture, they were increasingly not allowed to do as much of the specialty stuff. These are the folks that don't complete a specialty residency (And Family Practice is considered a specialty residency, by the way...) but are still licensed to practice medicine. Now, an internal medicine doctor, which I'd call a General Internist or an Internist, would be a physician who specialized in the medical care of adults. No surgery, and technically no pediatrics, no obstetrics, no setting bones, etc. Just handling things like hypertension, diabetes, renal insufficiency, seizure disorders, etc, etc, etc. As it turns out, I've given up obstetrics, surgery, all but the most elementary orthopedics, etc; I do do more pediatrics than a general internist, and I still stitch up gashes and such which most general internists wouldn't do, but I'm awfully close to being one, anymore. Why? With the cost of the malpractice for a lot of the things I used to do, I can't afford it. Folks that do obstetrics pay more a year for malpractice than I MAKE a year. I'm nuts, but not that nuts!!! OK, a really rambling explanation, but it's the straight answer from an insider...
    4 answers · Medicine · 1 decade ago
  • Get some medication it's simple to do.?

    Best answer: I presume that you're advocating using medication for suicide, with this non-question. Frankly, as far as I can tell after over a quarter of a century of practicing medicine, there's really nothing dignified about dying, no matter how it happens. I've seen quite enough of it, from an incredible number of different causes... show more
    Best answer: I presume that you're advocating using medication for suicide, with this non-question. Frankly, as far as I can tell after over a quarter of a century of practicing medicine, there's really nothing dignified about dying, no matter how it happens. I've seen quite enough of it, from an incredible number of different causes including an assortment of modes of suicide, and from what I've seen, you're no more dignified when you've died by suicide than when you've died by, say, cancer or Alzheimer's or renal failure. You're just dead. That's hardly dignified. Dignity isn't running away from reality, which suicide does. Dignity is handling what you're faced with, showing courage and endurance to the last breath. I've seen people that have done that--faced their inevitable death with real dignity--and the memory of their last hours (as a physician, I often am present during them, you understand) is a treasure that you're obviously incapable of imagining. Pardon the tirade--but it seems relevant.
    2 answers · Medicine · 1 decade ago
  • How long does marijuana stay in your system?

    Best answer: There is essentially no way of beating the test without leaving evidence that you're trying to beat the test--assuming that what they're using is a standard ELISA-GC/MS structure. Now if they're using one of those quickie screening things (nicknamed "Shake and Bake" tests by a lot of us in the field), pushing... show more
    Best answer: There is essentially no way of beating the test without leaving evidence that you're trying to beat the test--assuming that what they're using is a standard ELISA-GC/MS structure. Now if they're using one of those quickie screening things (nicknamed "Shake and Bake" tests by a lot of us in the field), pushing fluids hard enough will dilute your urine to the point that you might not have high enough levels to trip the test. Shake & Bakes are a bit easier to fool than the GC/MS thing, frankly. On the whole, detectable levels persist about a month, but there are a lot of variables involved, so you can't really hang your hat on that.
    4 answers · Medicine · 1 decade ago
  • Can u give me a brief overview of the day in the life of a suregeon??

    Best answer: No description will totally capture all surgical specialties, but the general idea runs something like this: Rises early, usually trying to get to the hospital around 6AM, to see the folks in the hospital. On days that they have surgery scheduled (usually specific days of the week) they start doing surgery as scheduled, as early as 6... show more
    Best answer: No description will totally capture all surgical specialties, but the general idea runs something like this: Rises early, usually trying to get to the hospital around 6AM, to see the folks in the hospital. On days that they have surgery scheduled (usually specific days of the week) they start doing surgery as scheduled, as early as 6 or 7 AM, leaving the hospital visits until later in the day; the other days, they do the hospital visits and head to their office where they see folks that are potentially in need of surgery or following up after having had surgery. Surgery itself involves getting into a scrub suit, then making connection with the operating room staff to make sure you know where the next surgery you're scheduled to do is going to happen. Once you've gone in and established that you've got the right person and the right procedure set up, you will oftyen go to the waiting area to talk briefly to the family members before doing the procedure. (Last time I let a colleague loose on my anatomy, they talked to my wife before hand, anyhow) Then you scrub up (8 minutes scrubbing the daylights out of your hands and arms from the fingers up to the elbows), rinse and gown up--there's a sterilized gown that you put on, along with the mask, hood and often shoe covers; then you put on the gloves (often two pair, now, in the age of HIV and increasingly rampant Hepatitis B), get to the patient's side and wait until adequate anesthesia is established. You're usually assisted by several individuals, some across the patient from you, some at your side. (It can get pretty crowded; that's one reason that I gave up doing surgery, personally.) You do what needs done, then when you're ready to close up the surgical wound, you wait until the sponges and tools and all are counted: if you're one short, you have to hunt until you find the missing object. You don't want to leave that whatever in the patient, after all. The surgery done, the customary thing to do is to ditch the gown and gloves and all, write down a record of what you did, then dictate a record of what you did, then get out to the waiting room and tell the family how things went, fielding the questions that they usually have. Most surgeons will go back in, check on the patient's status (usually, they're in the recovery area by this point) and then start preparing for the next procedure. A surgeon might go through this cycle several times in a given day. Whether it's an office day or a surgery day, once you get done, most folks check in on the folks they have in the hospital, seeing how they are doing and if they need to be visited again over some issue or other: sometimes they do, sometimes they don't. ON TOP OF ALL THAT, periodically you're the "Surgeon On Call" which means that anyone showing up in the emergency department with a surgical problem (and doesn't have a doctor that comes to that hospital to bear the load) becomes your task. Often, those surgical problems require immediate intervention--that's pronounced, do the surgery as quickly as possible. I've known colleagues to have to go 12 hours and more non-stop (sometimes 24 hours or more) before they can take a break. On light days, you might put in 5 or 6 hours. Those are not common. On more normal days, figure 8-10, and often 12-14 hours. The rough days? Figure on going 20-24 hours. It's not an easy life, trust me.
    1 answer · Medicine · 1 decade ago