• Is water wet?

    11 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • What is the difference between Species Oxidized and Oxidizing Agent?

    Best answer: Oxidation and oxidizing agent.... Oxidation = increase in oxidation state Reduction = decrease in oxidation state Oxidizing agent = reactant which contains the element reduced Reducing agent = reactant which contains the element oxidized Consider the reaction of silver metal with hydrogen sulfide. ..0........... show more
    Best answer: Oxidation and oxidizing agent....

    Oxidation = increase in oxidation state
    Reduction = decrease in oxidation state
    Oxidizing agent = reactant which contains the element reduced
    Reducing agent = reactant which contains the element oxidized

    Consider the reaction of silver metal with hydrogen sulfide.
    ..0........ +1-2......... +1-2 ......... 0 .............. oxidation states
    Ag(s) + H2S(g) --> Ag2S(s) + H2(g)

    Silver is oxidized .. it's oxidation state increases
    Hydrogen is reduced .. it oxidation state decreases
    H2S is the oxidizing agent ... it contains the element reduced
    Ag is the reducing agent ... it contains the element oxidized

    Neither H2S and Ag2S are "ionic". Ag-S bonds have about 10% ionic character. There is no actual loss or gain of electrons despite the way we write half-reactions. But, there are changes in oxidation state, making this a redox reaction.

    The bottom line:
    In some redox reaction there may be transfers of electrons, but not all redox reactions. In some redox reactions the elements end up with the same electrons they started with. But in redox reactions there will always be changes in oxidation state. The oxidizing agents and reducing agents will always be reactants in the balanced molecular or ionic equation, not just the elements reduced or oxidized.
    4 answers · 1 week ago
  • Is pure oxygen lethal to breathe?

    Best answer: Eventually. A high concentration or high pressure of oxygen leads your body to build up toxins that affect the nervous system, lungs, eyes and several other effects, through the production of free radicals, those substances that antioxidants are supposed to fight.
    Best answer: Eventually. A high concentration or high pressure of oxygen leads your body to build up toxins that affect the nervous system, lungs, eyes and several other effects, through the production of free radicals, those substances that antioxidants are supposed to fight.
    6 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • What is the volume of 6 mL?

    6 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • How many miles of carbon atoms are there in 4 mol of dimethylsulfoxide? A.2 B.6 C.8 D.4?

    Best answer: dimethyl sulfoxide = C2H6OS = 78.1334 g/mol

    (4 mol DMSO) x (2 mol C / 1 mol DMSO) = 8 mol C
    Best answer: dimethyl sulfoxide = C2H6OS = 78.1334 g/mol

    (4 mol DMSO) x (2 mol C / 1 mol DMSO) = 8 mol C
    5 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • How to change mL to grams?

    Best answer: "How to change mL to grams?" You don't, not directly anyway, since they are measuring two different properties, volume and mass. You need a ratio which is a characteristic of the substance to do the conversion. That ratio is density. Each substance has a density which can be found experimentally... show more
    Best answer: "How to change mL to grams?"

    You don't, not directly anyway, since they are measuring two different properties, volume and mass. You need a ratio which is a characteristic of the substance to do the conversion. That ratio is density. Each substance has a density which can be found experimentally or in tables. Once you know the density (often in g/mL for liquids), then you can use it as a conversion factor to convert from mass to volume or volume to mass for that specific substance.

    Use the density equation
    D = m / V
    m = V D
    m = a mL x (b grams/mL) = ab grams

    Or, use density as a conversion factor
    a mL x ( b grams / 1 mL) = ab grams
    5 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • What is the anion?! Chemistry help!?

    Best answer: A transition metal with 29 protons and 27 electrons is Cu^2+ ion. From period 2, you have choices of C, N, O, F. N does not have a -2 valence. It is -3. So, it would be CuO, copper(II) oxide.
    Best answer: A transition metal with 29 protons and 27 electrons is Cu^2+ ion. From period 2, you have choices of C, N, O, F. N does not have a -2 valence. It is -3. So, it would be CuO, copper(II) oxide.
    4 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Chemistry Help Please?

    Best answer: (4.18 J/g°C) x (20.05 mL x 1.00 g/mL) x (19.8 - 9.1)°C / (3.02 g NH4Cl / (53.4915 g NH4Cl/mol)) =
    15884 J/mol = 15.9 kJ/mol NH4Cl
    Best answer: (4.18 J/g°C) x (20.05 mL x 1.00 g/mL) x (19.8 - 9.1)°C / (3.02 g NH4Cl / (53.4915 g NH4Cl/mol)) =
    15884 J/mol = 15.9 kJ/mol NH4Cl
    5 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Chem help?

    Best answer: Einstein's equation.... Einstein's equation applies to mass and energy, but not in the way that is frequently taught in beginning courses. The equation E=mc² is fraught with misconceptions, most of which come from well-meaning teachers and some who write about science. The equation is NOT about matter... show more
    Best answer: Einstein's equation....

    Einstein's equation applies to mass and energy, but not in the way that is frequently taught in beginning courses. The equation E=mc² is fraught with misconceptions, most of which come from well-meaning teachers and some who write about science. The equation is NOT about matter being converted into energy or vice versa. But it's so easy to make that mistake because matter (which has mass) and energy seem so different and are measured in different units.... up to a point. (Physicists often measure both mass and energy in electron volts (as in MeV).

    The problem is that the equation is portrayed as dealing with the CONVERSION of mass into energy, but that is not what it's all about. Instead, it deals with the CONSERVATION of mass and energy. The first problem deals with mass and energy as being two different things, when, instead, they are really the same thing. For lack of a better term it's called mass-energy.

    Whether a nuclear reaction (where the mass-energy changes are more easily detected) or a chemical reaction reaction (where mass-energy changes are negligible and below the limit of detection), both energy and mass are conserved. One does not magically turn into the other.

    Reactant1 + Reactant2 --> Product + energy
    m-e(1) .......... m-e(2) ......... m-e(p) ... m-e(e)
    m-e(1) + m-e(2) = m-e(p) + m-e(e) ........ conservation of mass-energy

    Your question is flawed from the get-go. It asks, "How much of this mass was lost in the process?" And the answer is that no mass was lost in the reaction. Mass wasn't
    "lost", nor was mass "converted" to energy. After the reaction there was just as much mass-energy as there was before the reaction. Too much is being read into the equation E=mc², things that it doesn't address.

    If you want to gain a better understanding then you may want to do some additional reading:
    https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/equivME/#2.1
    or
    https://scilearn.sydney.edu.au/fychemistry/tutorial_assignments/chem1901/week%202.pdf
    5 answers · 3 weeks ago
  • Whats the density of water?

    8 answers · 3 weeks ago
  • Is chemistry hard for you?

    chemists perform experiments to find out how different kinds of matter can change and
    chemists perform experiments to find out how different kinds of matter can change and
    11 answers · 3 weeks ago
  • Chemistry?

    Best answer: electrons in a neutrally charged atom.
    Best answer: electrons in a neutrally charged atom.
    5 answers · 3 weeks ago
  • Is helium a molecular element?

    7 answers · 3 weeks ago