• How to become good in chemistry?

    I suck at chemistry and I want to be good at it so I can study in America but how do I become good? Right now I’m learning about moles but I can’t do the math it’s too hard or I don’t understand. So how do I become good? At chemistry
    I suck at chemistry and I want to be good at it so I can study in America but how do I become good? Right now I’m learning about moles but I can’t do the math it’s too hard or I don’t understand. So how do I become good? At chemistry
    7 answers · 1 week ago
  • Which of the following statements is false? Why?

    Best answer: True/false a). Solutions are always homogeneous mixtures. ... TRUE .... That's the definition of a solution. It is a homogeneous mixture b). The terms “atom” and “element” can have different meanings. ... TRUE .... Atoms are the particles of elements, whereas an element is one of the unique, naturally... show more
    Best answer: True/false

    a). Solutions are always homogeneous mixtures. ... TRUE
    .... That's the definition of a solution. It is a homogeneous mixture
    b). The terms “atom” and “element” can have different meanings. ... TRUE
    .... Atoms are the particles of elements, whereas an element is one of the unique, naturally occurring "building blocks" of compounds.
    c). Elements can exist as atoms or molecules. .... TRUE
    .... There are the common diatomic elements: H2, N2, O2, F2, Cl2, Br2, I2 plus P4 and S8, and the list keeps going.
    d). Compounds can exist as atoms or molecules. .... FALSE
    .... You can't have an atom of a compound. The smallest particle of a compound is a molecule.
    e). At least two of the above statements (A-D) are false .... FALSE
    ..... There's only one which is false.
    4 answers · 1 week ago
  • Which of the following is decomposition reactions?

    Best answer: Reaction types..... What you really need to know is how to identify all of the basic reaction types. Each has a distinctive format that makes it easy. 1. synthesis (combination) .... only one product 2. decomposition .... only one reactant 3. single replacement .... element + compound --> element + compound 4.... show more
    Best answer: Reaction types.....

    What you really need to know is how to identify all of the basic reaction types. Each has a distinctive format that makes it easy.
    1. synthesis (combination) .... only one product
    2. decomposition .... only one reactant
    3. single replacement .... element + compound --> element + compound
    4. double replacement .... two compounds on each side, where (a) there is the formation of a precipitate, or (b) there is an acid/base reaction (usually a simple Arrhenius A/B reaction).
    5. complete combustion of a hydrocarbon .... hydrocarbon burns in O2 to make CO2 and H2O

    Of your choices, only (D) has a single reactant, and it is the decomposition reaction. Just because some are balanced, doesn't help you identify the reaction type.

    You can find general descriptions of these at my website, along with a sample worksheet.
    https://c7chemistry.wikispaces.com/file/...
    https://c7chemistry.wikispaces.com/file/...
    4 answers · 1 week ago
  • What is mass?

    4 answers · 1 week ago
  • Calculate the kinetic energy of a 116. mg raindrop moving at a speed of 6.9 m/s. Round your answer to 2 significant digits. ?J?

    Best answer: KE = 1/2 * m * speed^2

    To get the energy in J, you want the mass in kg and the speed in m/sec.

    0.0028 J
    Best answer: KE = 1/2 * m * speed^2

    To get the energy in J, you want the mass in kg and the speed in m/sec.

    0.0028 J
    4 answers · 1 week ago
  • Calculate the pressure exerted by 1.00 mol of CO2 in a 1.00 L vessel at 300 K, assuming that the gas behaves ideally.?

    Best answer: Your teacher is an idiot. "Assuming the gas behaves ideally" would mean NOT using the Van der Waals equation! The Van der Waals equation accounts for some of the departures from ideal behavior. Oh well, sorry you have to be taught by a moron. Anyway, the Van der Waals equation says [p + a(n/V)^2]*(V/n... show more
    Best answer: Your teacher is an idiot. "Assuming the gas behaves ideally" would mean NOT using the Van der Waals equation! The Van der Waals equation accounts for some of the departures from ideal behavior. Oh well, sorry you have to be taught by a moron.

    Anyway, the Van der Waals equation says
    [p + a(n/V)^2]*(V/n - b) = RT,
    and one must first look up the "a" and "b" for the particular gas.
    Internet says a and b for CO2 are 3.592 L^2-atm/mol^2 and 0.04267 L/mol.
    So you have
    [p + (3.592)(1.00/1.00)^2 atm] * (1.00/1.00 - 0.04267) L/mol = (0.08206 L atm/molK)(300K) =>
    (p + 3.592 atm)(0.95733) = (0.08206 atm)(300) =>
    (p + 3.592 atm) = (25.715 atm) => p = 22.1 atm.

    To see that this APPROXIMATELY makes sense, consider that 1 mole of ideal gas occupies 22.4 liters at STP. So if the gas is confined to 1 liter, the pressure should be about 22 atmospheres! (The departure from ideal gas behavior is not a whole lot.)
    4 answers · 1 week ago
  • Chemistry question?

    which of the following pairs is related by an inverse relationship? a. pressure and temperature b. volume and pressure c. temperature and volume d. moles and volume
    which of the following pairs is related by an inverse relationship? a. pressure and temperature b. volume and pressure c. temperature and volume d. moles and volume
    5 answers · 1 week ago
  • What is a CBC/Chemistry ?

    4 answers · 1 week ago
  • Radioactive Radon-222 gas (222Rn) occurs naturally as a product of uranium decay. The half-life of 222Rn is 3.8 days.?

    Suppose a flask originally contained 8.0×1013 atoms of 222Rn. How many atoms of 222Rn will remain after one month (30. days)?
    Suppose a flask originally contained 8.0×1013 atoms of 222Rn. How many atoms of 222Rn will remain after one month (30. days)?
    4 answers · 1 week ago
  • If you are treating 1 million gallons/day (MGD) of water and adding enough fluoride to obtain a concentration of 1 mg/l, how many kilograms?

    If you are treating 1 million gallons/day (MGD) of water and adding enough fluoride to obtain a concentration of 1 mg/l, how many kilograms of fluoride must you add each day? If you are adding the fluoride as sodium fluorosilicate, how many pounds per day of that must you add to obtain 1 mg/l fluoride?
    If you are treating 1 million gallons/day (MGD) of water and adding enough fluoride to obtain a concentration of 1 mg/l, how many kilograms of fluoride must you add each day? If you are adding the fluoride as sodium fluorosilicate, how many pounds per day of that must you add to obtain 1 mg/l fluoride?
    4 answers · 1 week ago
  • HELP!! Chemistry Question!?

    For the reaction A(g) <--->2B(g) , what is the equilibrium concentration f B if the initial concentration of A is 1.0 M and Kc=16.0 B=[?]M
    For the reaction A(g) <--->2B(g) , what is the equilibrium concentration f B if the initial concentration of A is 1.0 M and Kc=16.0 B=[?]M
    4 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • What elements are liquid?

    Best answer: Mercury is liquid and Bromine is liquid.
    Now, depending on your definition of room temperature you can also count gallium which has melting point of around 30C.
    Cesium is also liquid with slightly lower melting point of around 28.4C
    Best answer: Mercury is liquid and Bromine is liquid.
    Now, depending on your definition of room temperature you can also count gallium which has melting point of around 30C.
    Cesium is also liquid with slightly lower melting point of around 28.4C
    7 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Lead poisoning ?

    Best answer: Heck, the nitrate was probably the more hazardous part of the solution. The concentration of the solution matters, of course, but even one at near-saturation would not be a risk for your health either for the short or long term, given that you barely had any contact. I doubt that even drinking an entire liter... show more
    Best answer: Heck, the nitrate was probably the more hazardous part of the solution. The concentration of the solution matters, of course, but even one at near-saturation would not be a risk for your health either for the short or long term, given that you barely had any contact. I doubt that even drinking an entire liter would be a major problem, at least from the lead side of things.

    I don't see it being a problem. Lead isn't generally an immediate danger to life and health. It isn't cyanide, it isn't thorium, and chronic (long-term) impacts from lead require a very significant exposure, which you did not get.
    5 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • How many atoms are in 3.18 moles of He?

    5 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • In a symbol equation, what does the big number do?

    i have an exam on sciences this tuesday so this is important. in a symbol equation, does the big number times or add, especially if it has a little number as well . eg. 2CO2. (2 on the end is supposed to be little). many thanks.
    i have an exam on sciences this tuesday so this is important. in a symbol equation, does the big number times or add, especially if it has a little number as well . eg. 2CO2. (2 on the end is supposed to be little). many thanks.
    5 answers · 2 weeks ago