• Can I use a HDD from my old pc on my new custom pc?

    Question says it all. I’m building a new pc. Can I use an HDD from an old pc I had and use it? I don’t need all my saved stuff to transfer over. Just wanna know if I can use it and save myself $50.
    Question says it all. I’m building a new pc. Can I use an HDD from an old pc I had and use it? I don’t need all my saved stuff to transfer over. Just wanna know if I can use it and save myself $50.
    5 answers · 2 days ago
  • Mouse & Keyboard or Controller? Bonus: What controller?

    Best answer: Depends on the game. Playing something like Civ would be impossible with a controller. Meanwhile I can't see playing something like NiER with a keyboard and mouse.

    I use my PS4 controller on my PC when I want a controller.
    Best answer: Depends on the game. Playing something like Civ would be impossible with a controller. Meanwhile I can't see playing something like NiER with a keyboard and mouse.

    I use my PS4 controller on my PC when I want a controller.
    3 answers · 3 days ago
  • Back to my gamng PC question,if a wal mart gaming PC says gaming on it,should it be able to run most games?

    Best answer: Some of the online offerings are for gaming but none I've seen in store were geared to gaming. At that price, I'd doubt it-you can barely source parts and build a gaming system yourself for that. It needs at the least an I5-6500, 8 Gb memory and some kind of PCI Express dedicated graphics card. The... show more
    Best answer: Some of the online offerings are for gaming but none I've seen in store were geared to gaming. At that price, I'd doubt it-you can barely source parts and build a gaming system yourself for that. It needs at the least an I5-6500, 8 Gb memory and some kind of PCI Express dedicated graphics card. The cybertron gaming pc packages they have online aren't horrible, start about that price without a monitor.
    4 answers · 4 days ago
  • What do you look for in a pc that will run steam games well?

    Best answer: Steam sells 1000s of games, from low-end indie games that are smartphone ports, to the latest "AAA" titles such as the newest CoD WW2 FPS, or Assassin's Creed Origin. Every game has its own requirements in terms of CPU, RAM, and Graphics Card. Some games require a controller. You can use a Xbox or... show more
    Best answer: Steam sells 1000s of games, from low-end indie games that are smartphone ports, to the latest "AAA" titles such as the newest CoD WW2 FPS, or Assassin's Creed Origin.

    Every game has its own requirements in terms of CPU, RAM, and Graphics Card. Some games require a controller. You can use a Xbox or Playstation controller, or Steam's own controller. Some games also require a VR headset such as the Oculus Rift or HTC Vive. I'd avoid the VR games for now - the equipment is still pretty expensive and the games are still pretty rough.

    A decent gaming desktop is going to cost around $800-1200, depending on the actual parts you choose.

    In general you'll probably want something like this:
    Processor: Intel i5. (The i7 is more powerful but doesn't do much for gaming - save your money.)
    RAM: 8GB minimum. 16GB is becoming more common but you can easily upgrade from 8GB to 16GB later on.
    Graphics card: nVidia GTX 1050 Ti. The current sweet spot for performance vs. budget.

    The graphics card is the most important item in a gaming PC since it's the thing that is going to process all the graphics and effects for the game. This is also why it's often the most expensive component in the PC. The 1050 Ti will handle most games at 1080p at a decent frame rate. However some of the newer games may demand more processing power, meaning you'll either have to lower the resolution or start turning off additional features in order to keep the frame rate up. Still it should serve you well, while not busting the bank.

    As for hard drive, this where you will store your operating system (Windows) applications (web browser, word processor, etc.) and games. If you want a bit of extra performance, consider a SSD instead of a normal hard drive. A SSD is basically a larger version of your USB thumbdrive. It's a lot faster than a hard drive, but, also a lot more expensive. Most people that go with a SSD stick with a 128GB or 256GB size since the larger ones get really expensive. Otherwise, a 2TB hard drive is pretty cheap, and will also give you plenty of space for games before you have to start deleting them. Once you buy a game on Steam, it's part of your account. This means you can download and delete the same game over and over again because you've already paid for it.
    7 answers · 1 week ago
  • TURN UP VOLUME ON PC?

    3 answers · 7 days ago
  • Hi My Pc ist very slow pls help?

    4 answers · 1 week ago
  • What does Ram do for PC gaming?

    So I'm a very casual gamer usually I stay on console gaming for ease of use 2 years ago I bought an Alienware alpha to play some PC gaming its been great I found out I can easily upgrade from 4gb of ram to 16gb very inexpensivly. What does increasing Ram actually do for gaming though ?
    So I'm a very casual gamer usually I stay on console gaming for ease of use 2 years ago I bought an Alienware alpha to play some PC gaming its been great I found out I can easily upgrade from 4gb of ram to 16gb very inexpensivly. What does increasing Ram actually do for gaming though ?
    10 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • How much is my gaming pc worth?

    How much is my gaming pc worth?

    GeForce GTX 970 I5 6600K CPU @ 3.50GHz 7.92 GB RAM
    GeForce GTX 970 I5 6600K CPU @ 3.50GHz 7.92 GB RAM
    5 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Is this Graphics Card good enough to play the latest games?

    msi geforce gtx 1050 ti 4gb will it be enough to play the latest games on pc?
    msi geforce gtx 1050 ti 4gb will it be enough to play the latest games on pc?
    5 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • I use a non gaming laptop ( toshiba) why was i able to play a PC game called "darkest of days"? on low settings?

    Best answer: PC games are just like any other piece of software that any computer can run. HOWEVER, "Gaming Class" PC's are equipped with the necessary hardware (like a decent graphics card) & specs to run most games (at the time it was manufactured or built) with minimal issues. Non-gaming PC's will try... show more
    Best answer: PC games are just like any other piece of software that any computer can run. HOWEVER, "Gaming Class" PC's are equipped with the necessary hardware (like a decent graphics card) & specs to run most games (at the time it was manufactured or built) with minimal issues.

    Non-gaming PC's will try to do their best efforts to run the games, but it shifts the processing load that would normally go to the graphics card's GPU to the CPU as well as the normal game code (so the CPU is rendering the graphics AND running the game). However, since CPU's are considered a "general processor" (like a swiss army knife or a simple calculator) & the GPU of a graphics card is a "specific use processor" (like a laser scalpel or a scientific graphing calculator), the non-gaming PC's CPU has to brute force everything, so framerate of the game would suffer greatly. Lowering the graphical settings will lighten the burden on the CPU (raising the framerate), but you'll never get close to acceptable performance on the graphically demanding games.

    More casual games (like the Bejeweled series, Bookworm, Scrabble, Solitaire, ect.) can be played without a graphics card because they're geared to be games that you can quickly played & either have 2D graphics or simple (& pre-rendered) 3D graphics that the CPU by itself can handle it.


    As for the game in question, Darkest of Days was released in 2009 & has fairly low minimum requirements for today's PC's as the game only needs a SINGLE CORE 2.0 GHz, processor & 128 MB's (1/8th or 0.125 GB's) of video RAM to run on 32-bit architecture. Modern PC's, even on the low-end that's geared for casual / office work are at least dual-core CPU's & mid-range systems are typically multi-core CPU's (typically 4 cores, although high-end consumer systems could have as many as 16 processing cores in one CPU) that's running 64-bit architecture. Even the integrated graphics cards (with an APU) may use 256 - 512 MB's (0.250 - 0.500 GB) of system RAM to handle graphical processing on the low-end of the graphical settings

    In short, the game's systems requirements have remained the same (per the norm for any released game that doesn't keep releasing new content & updates), but the base computer hardware has improved to the point that those original requirements are now more mundane... this is within 8 years! While processors have moved away from raw processing speed (as it's hard to find processors going much beyond the 4.0 GHz mark), newer generation processors can handle more than their predecessors.


    I know this may be a bit long-winded, but as said up above... PC games are just like any other program on a computer, while they work best the necessary equipment, your computer will try it's best with what it has (unless the game has internal checks to prevent it from running on underpowered systems)... even if it means less than desirable results.


    Hope this sheds some light on the subject.
    5 answers · 3 weeks ago
  • What is the name of this assault rifle?

    What is the name of this assault rifle?

    Best answer: AK 15
    Best answer: AK 15
    5 answers · 3 weeks ago
  • My pc started smoking and never turned on again some help? plsss?

    Best answer: Sounds like a power supply failure. Unfortunately, a power supply failure is often catastrophic and will destroy other components in the process. Of course, do not send any more power through the pc or the components. Inspect each component where the power supply connects to it for damage (usually melting/burn... show more
    Best answer: Sounds like a power supply failure. Unfortunately, a power supply failure is often catastrophic and will destroy other components in the process.

    Of course, do not send any more power through the pc or the components. Inspect each component where the power supply connects to it for damage (usually melting/burn marks) on or around the connectors. If you notice melting or burn marks, its very likely that component is dead and will likely need to replace. Also, try using your sense of smell to determine whether or not the components may have been affected. If the components smell burnt/fried, especially after taking them out and letting them air out a bit, it also may mean they are damaged and may need replacement.

    If components show no signs of external damage, you can attempt to connect them to another pc (or your replacement pc) to see if they are still functional. This also includes USB devices that were connected at the time. They may not show signs of damage but they still may be. Use another pc to test them.

    This is what happens when you don't use a decent quality power supply, and/or when you let too much dust and dirt build up inside the power supply and pc. Often times on pre-built computers, the power supply is very low quality. So its recommended you replace the stock power supply in many cases, especially if you do any hardware additions or upgrades and/or overclocking.

    When you buy decent quality power supplies, sometimes they will replace the damaged hardware if you send them proof and they find the cause was a defect in the power supply. (the really cheap brands won't do that. probably because they know their shitty psus cant wait to catch on fire)
    10 answers · 3 weeks ago
  • Why is my pc so slow??

    Best answer: Without being there in person to review the system... it's hard to say what the issue(s) could be. Therefore, I can only provide generic information. First up, double-check ALL DRIVERS for your computer. A bad driver can potentially cause bottlenecks & getting the latest drivers usually fixes the... show more
    Best answer: Without being there in person to review the system... it's hard to say what the issue(s) could be. Therefore, I can only provide generic information.

    First up, double-check ALL DRIVERS for your computer. A bad driver can potentially cause bottlenecks & getting the latest drivers usually fixes the issue.

    Second, double-check for OS updates... mostly to squish bugs that may cause slowdowns

    Third, check how many programs are start-up at boot -- This is typically a common offender, ESPECIALLY when you're not paying attention to installer settings (or just running through with the defaults). The more stuff that wants to start up, the longer it'll take to reach a "ready" state & the slower your system will likely run since stuff will be taking up resources in the background. Ideally, you want to keep this list as short as possible (critical system stuff, anti-virus / security software & possibly software that you access multiple times in a day).

    Fourth, run Check Disc on your storage drive(s) -- While it's unlikely to be an issue (as your system is so young), defects in hardware & the storage space (more in HDD's than SSD's) can cause systems to practically grind down to a virtual halt until detected by the system & could take down the entire system if not caught & fixed (as this is a serious issue with HDD's).

    Fifth, check component temperatures as well as cooling methods (airflow, ect.) -- High internal temperatures can wreck havoc for performance as your CPU & Graphics card will engage their thermal throttling measures. Thermal Throttling is mostly a self-preservation measure to keep things within "relatively safe" operating temperatures as you really don't want to buy new components because they become a useless mess of solder & silicon. Besides checking the internals of your system (cables properly tucked away, filters are cleaned & whatnot) as well as where the vents (intake & exhaust) are so you can avoid blocking them. You may want to get a can of compressed air for "dusting" purposes (as dust can be a major pain, especially inside a computer).

    Sixth, DOUBLE CHECK for any viruses, malware, spyware or any other unwanted software on your system. -- While you claimed there's no viruses on the system, it doesn't mean there's nothing unwanted lurking about or has currently gone undetected... so you should always do scan when things are in question. Then, check your installed program list & delete anything you don't recognize or know it's unwanted (like toolbars, which are commonly bundled with software).


    Beyond that, I would have to recommend seeking professional help locally. It will be a bit expensive (typically $60+ / hr), but it will likely save you weeks of headaches.
    5 answers · 3 weeks ago