• In my own opinion, NASA is slow, what do you say?

    I mean, why can't they go on space explorations to distant places just like in the movies? All they do is send space probes mostly.
    I mean, why can't they go on space explorations to distant places just like in the movies? All they do is send space probes mostly.
    17 answers · 21 hours ago
  • Why isnt pluto a planet?

    Best answer: Pluto didn't pay its dues to join the big planet club.
    Best answer: Pluto didn't pay its dues to join the big planet club.
    18 answers · 2 days ago
  • BOOM BOOM!!!! BIG BANG!!!! The universe appears like MAGIC out of nothing, then monkeys wave their magic wands & turn into humans?

    Ahhhh, atheists are so intelligent aren't they?
    Ahhhh, atheists are so intelligent aren't they?
    65 answers · 6 days ago
  • Is there life on Europa?

    Best answer: Probably not, but obviously no one knows. Other worlds like Enceladus also hold exciting prospects for extraterrestrial life; there may be liquid oceans on Ceres and Ganymede as well.
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    If we ever discover extraterrestrial life, you won't have to ask about it here.
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    Best answer: Probably not, but obviously no one knows. Other worlds like Enceladus also hold exciting prospects for extraterrestrial life; there may be liquid oceans on Ceres and Ganymede as well.
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    If we ever discover extraterrestrial life, you won't have to ask about it here.
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    9 answers · 16 hours ago
  • Are the sun spots made of dark energy?

    9 answers · 20 hours ago
  • In space does your poop just float back into your butt?

    How on Earth do astronauts poop???
    How on Earth do astronauts poop???
    11 answers · 2 days ago
  • Who invented constellations and how did they come up with them?

    Best answer: Most of the named constellations are the conception of ancient peoples -- in some cases, the Greeks of several centuries BC, and in other cases probably the Babylonians of 1000-2000 years BC. Yes, the appearance of star-groups was a vehicle for imaginative stories, but the usefulness of constellations in science... show more
    Best answer: Most of the named constellations are the conception of ancient peoples -- in some cases, the Greeks of several centuries BC, and in other cases probably the Babylonians of 1000-2000 years BC. Yes, the appearance of star-groups was a vehicle for imaginative stories, but the usefulness of constellations in science has been that they enabled astronomers to attach names to particular stars and to communicate to others the apparent locations of those individual stars in the night sky. Thus, we know most stars by names derived from the constellations in which they appear: Alpha Centauri, Alpha Lyrae (or Vega), Alpha Bootis (or Arcturus), and so forth. The "Alpha" name is attached to the brightest star in each constellation, and second-brightest is named Beta, etc. Nowadays we could of course revise the constellation-naming convention, but there really is no systematic scientific reason to name them differently, so traditional names remain the most convenient.
    12 answers · 2 days ago
  • Can i launch a mini robot to moon?

    so i've planed out that i launch a high altitude balloon carrying a mini drone (regular propeller drone) into space as high as the balloon can go, and then launch off the drone as high as IT can go, and then maybe have a the drone carrying a very small rocket which launches when the drone gets as high as it can... show more
    so i've planed out that i launch a high altitude balloon carrying a mini drone (regular propeller drone) into space as high as the balloon can go, and then launch off the drone as high as IT can go, and then maybe have a the drone carrying a very small rocket which launches when the drone gets as high as it can go, and have a mini robot or something in that rocket. could i reach space or the moon this way?
    18 answers · 4 days ago
  • Why is it harder to fly to the Sun then to Mars?

    Best answer: Ah good question. It isn't harder if all we wanted to do is to crash into the Sun. But we want to orbit it in a 4 million mile radius. And because of the enormous gravity pull of the Sun at 4 million miles, the orbit speed of the Parker Probe has to be over 400,000 mph. If it isn't that fast, the... show more
    Best answer: Ah good question. It isn't harder if all we wanted to do is to crash into the Sun.

    But we want to orbit it in a 4 million mile radius. And because of the enormous gravity pull of the Sun at 4 million miles, the orbit speed of the Parker Probe has to be over 400,000 mph. If it isn't that fast, the probe would indeed fall into the Sun.

    And that's the hard part, getting that probe up to speed in an orbit at that distance. If successful, the Parker Probe will be the fastest object ever launched by mankind.
    9 answers · 2 days ago
  • Was our Sun and solar system formed by the molecular cloud left over by the death of a previous star and solar system before ours?

    Best answer: Previous stars, definitely yes. Previous planetary systems, perhaps not. The terrestrial planets would not exist were it not for stars that lived before the sun. The first two elements of the periodic table, Hydrogen and Helium, are commonly available in the universe. To form planets like Earth, however, we need... show more
    Best answer: Previous stars, definitely yes. Previous planetary systems, perhaps not.

    The terrestrial planets would not exist were it not for stars that lived before the sun. The first two elements of the periodic table, Hydrogen and Helium, are commonly available in the universe. To form planets like Earth, however, we need heavier elements; and those are created in stars. Stars convert Hydrogen into Helium through process of nuclear fusion. When they run out of hydrogen, they begin to fuse Helium to make heavier elements, working down the periodic table all the way to Iron.

    Once a star begins to produce Iron, it no longer has enough energy to produce other elements. It reaches a point of saturation, begins to collapse on itself, and then goes supernova. In addition to dispersing all the chemical elements produced so far, the explosion also provides the energy needed to produce other natural elements all way up to Uranium.

    These chemical elements are the ingredients needed form planets like Earth.
    10 answers · 3 days ago
  • If a single atom suddenly grew to the size of a universe, How much matter would be in that universe?

    How similar would it be to our universe?
    How similar would it be to our universe?
    6 answers · 21 hours ago