• Can I use a charger with a different amperage output than the original?

    So here's the deal. I have a dash cam and the original car charger that came with it converts the cars 12v to 5v with 2.5 amps. The hardwire kit for it that I'm wanting to buy says 12v to 5v with 2 amps. That's a drop of .5 amps and it is their own brand. Problem is, it's not in stock and I need it... show more
    So here's the deal. I have a dash cam and the original car charger that came with it converts the cars 12v to 5v with 2.5 amps. The hardwire kit for it that I'm wanting to buy says 12v to 5v with 2 amps. That's a drop of .5 amps and it is their own brand. Problem is, it's not in stock and I need it asap. I saw one for another brand with the same usb connector that converts 12v to 5 as well but with only 1.5 amps. Will that be an issue? From what I can gather if you use a charger that is rated for higher amps it won't be an issue but if you use one rated lower it can cause malfunctions and the power supply can also overheat trying to supply the extra amps. Here's my thing....two different products from the same company say different amperage outputs. One is 2.5 and the other is 2. So the 1.5 should be ok right. Going by their hardware kit it dropped by .5 amps so the 1.5 should be fine right? Who even knows what the actual amperage rating is for the camera? I can't find it anywhere on the camera itself or the box or manual. It only speaks of the charger. Please help!
    5 answers · Cameras · 3 days ago
  • Can the Nikon D3200 still compete with other dslrs today?

    Best answer: Yes, it can compete with anything in Nikon's D3xxx line with some of Canon's T series DSLRs. I wouldn't worry whether your D3200 is "still" a good camera. If it's a good camera for you today, it will always be a good camera for you just as long as your needs do not change. The D3200 is... show more
    Best answer: Yes, it can compete with anything in Nikon's D3xxx line with some of Canon's T series DSLRs.

    I wouldn't worry whether your D3200 is "still" a good camera. If it's a good camera for you today, it will always be a good camera for you just as long as your needs do not change.

    The D3200 is at the bottom of the line for Nikon. So even when it was new, there were DSLRs such as those from Nikon, Canon and especially Pentax that were significantly better and the D3200 most certainly couldn't compete against. The D3200 was recently discontinued so there hasn't been enough time where its features are completely outdated. But even when that day comes, if the camera is meeting or exceeding the needs of the user, then it literally doesn't matter if it can or can't compete against modern cameras.
    9 answers · Cameras · 23 hours ago
  • Does using the HDMI Output on a camera let you go over the 30 minute recording limit?

    I've seen the Atomos Ninja and it says you can go over the limit, but I'm not understanding how that'll work. In particular, I'm trying to get past the recording limit on a Fujifilm X100F in order to live stream to Facebook.
    I've seen the Atomos Ninja and it says you can go over the limit, but I'm not understanding how that'll work. In particular, I'm trying to get past the recording limit on a Fujifilm X100F in order to live stream to Facebook.
    7 answers · Cameras · 15 hours ago
  • Can I not pay for service that I was unsatisfied with?

    So, on Friday my phone accidentally fell out of my pocket and the screen cracked. I brought it in to a tech shop to repair and the owner said he would have it done by the end of the day at around 6:30. When I came back at 6:30 he had already closed his shop, when I checked the store hours, the store closed at... show more
    So, on Friday my phone accidentally fell out of my pocket and the screen cracked. I brought it in to a tech shop to repair and the owner said he would have it done by the end of the day at around 6:30. When I came back at 6:30 he had already closed his shop, when I checked the store hours, the store closed at 7:00pm. I was angry at this because he closed his shop early but I told myself I would just come back tomorrow when the store opens. When I came back at Noon on Saturday, when the store was supposed to open, it still wasnt open. I WAITED FOR 45 MINUTES FOR THE TECH SHOP TO OPEN AND THE OWNER WAS NO WHERE IN SIGHT. Because I was late for work I had to leave the shop. The store was closed Sunday so now I have to wait for Monday. To put it briefly, I looked to have my phone fixed on Friday and I ended up going to whole weekend without my phone. When I go pick it up, can I refuse to pay for the service?
    11 answers · Cell Phones & Plans · 2 days ago
  • What should I do should I get a new phone or not be embarrassed? And how do I convince my parents to get me a new phone?

    Best answer: Go even cooler and get an old-school Nokia. Look, unless you really need a personal computer in your pocket, if all you really do is talk and text, the "latest" phone will not really change your life unless you use the computer to access the internet because it is integral to your business and the phone... show more
    Best answer: Go even cooler and get an old-school Nokia. Look, unless you really need a personal computer in your pocket, if all you really do is talk and text, the "latest" phone will not really change your life unless you use the computer to access the internet because it is integral to your business and the phone helps you earn money to pay the phone bill. Even more so, the "latest" phone is usually a target for getting stolen! Go backwards and search out the "un-coolest" phone you can find BUT is the cheapest to pay. I sometimes miss those tiny pink cute pocket-sized cell phones that had amazing reception on top of the mountain. One of those cute little phones makes it easy to travel on field trips as being the least likely to get taken away from by a teacher. Even better get a Motorola that is capable of having the best GPS map on it and start playing the old GPS treasure hunt game and even better have battery for phone ready when you need a phone because the battery is not spent playing games or videos all the time. But why run with the pack and be like everyone else when you can have one of those fun old phones you can decorate and not worry about getting lost or stolen? I know this is not the answer you seek, but the other answer I could give, which is to go out and earn money and buy your own iphone is probably not what you want to hear, either. I mean, there is no convincing your parents if you buy it yourself with your own money. And how do you earn money at your age? Well, there's all kinds of ideas. We just helped the church park cars at the lake for the 4th of July fireworks show, and you could have had a booth selling sodas, bottled water, and glow sticks. There's a girl, she started when she was 12 making soaps --- her aunt and uncle have a restaurant and were throwing away old cooking oil. She cleans and strains the cooking oil and then recycles it to make soaps, makes her own labels from recycled paper, then sells it at her own booth at the Farmer's Market. She is now 17 and her soaps have paid for her college education. One kid went around with his dad on their paper route and started collecting broken bicycles they found in the alley and fixed them up and sold the bikes at the flea market, today he owns 3 bike rental stands at 3 California beach piers and his own bicycle shop. Pick up wood by the side of the road, use a saw to cut it into cute animal shapes, paint the shapes and sell them as Christmas ornaments. Old fabric can be sewn into cute little animals to sell as Christmas ornaments. Get together with friends and set up a Halloween Haunted House and charge a couple dollars entrance for Halloween. Plant pumpkin seeds now and sell pumpkins for Halloween. But instead of crying about not having the newest phone, solve the problem by getting it yourself and using it for your needs. Good luck anyway.
    6 answers · Cell Phones & Plans · 19 hours ago
  • Quality for the money?

    Best answer: Canon vs. Nikon: Choosing the Right Camera System? Off the top of my head, I'd say Canon and Nikon are the two largest players in the digital SLR market. We break down the differences between the two systems to help you choose the right camera and lens combination. If you're a first-time SLR shopper... show more
    Best answer: Canon vs. Nikon: Choosing the Right Camera System?

    Off the top of my head, I'd say Canon and Nikon are the two largest players in the digital SLR market. We break down the differences between the two systems to help you choose the right camera and lens combination.
    If you're a first-time SLR shopper you're purchasing more than just a camera, you're buying into a camera system. If you buy an extra lens or two, a flash, or other add-ons, you'll be able to take them with you to your next camera—and good glass often equals or exceeds the price of the camera itself, so this is no small factor. There are a wealth of interchangeable lens systems on the market today, including mirrorless cameras, fixed-mirror SLRs with electronic viewfinders from Sony, and traditional D-SLRs.
    If you've already read our Digital SLR buying guide and have decided on a traditional D-SLR, you're left with three brand choices: Canon, Nikon, and Pentax. The latter is the smallest of the three in terms of market share, but offers a number of bodies and lenses that are fully weather sealed, like the Pentax K-30$690.19 at Walmart.com. The strength of the Pentax system relies in compact fixed focal length lenses, so you'll have more zoom lens options with Nikon or Canon, as well as the ability to eventually upgrade to a full-frame camera, which is currently lacking from the Pentax digital catalog.
    Playing the numbers, most buyers will opt for one of the big two, and doing so gives you access to the widest variety of lenses and accessories. If you've decided that you feel most comfortable in the big-tent world of Canon or Nikon, you'll still have to decide between the two. This guide should help you make that decision.
    The Camera
    Both companies have a few entry-level (under-$1,000) SLR models that ship with an 18-55mm starter lens. These bodies use APS-C image sensors, which are roughly 75 percent the size of a 35mm film frame when measured diagonally. Because digital SLR lens mounts are based on older 35mm film standards, you'll hear a lot about the crop factor when it comes to using lenses on these APS-C bodies; the 18-55mm zoom is roughly the same as a 28-80mm on a 35mm or full-frame digital camera.
    Canon's current entry-level D-SLR is the EOS Rebel T3$589.99 at Amazon; it's priced at $549.99 with a lens, but it's an older model, and is available for less online. It's not dissimilar in features to Nikon's entry-level body, the D3100 (above), which lists at $649.95, but is also a bit older and selling for less. Both cameras feature fixed rear LCDs, use pentamirror-style viewfinders, are limited to shooting at 3 frames per second, and have basic autofocus systems that can hold their own when using the optical viewfinder, but are a bit slow when you shoot in Live View mode, using the LCD to frame your shots.
    As entry models, they both feature a Guide Mode, which will help you learn more about the camera's functions, and in addition to the standard Automatic, Program, Aperture, Shutter, and Manual SLR shooting modes, they offer point-and-shoot style Scene Modes. This optimizes camera settings to capture what you are shooting—there are common modes for fast action, low light, snowy scenes, and others.
    When you move up to more expensive bodies, features increase in kind on both sides of the fence. The Canon EOS Rebel T4i (left) and the Nikon D5100 add faster continuous shooting and articulating rear displays (the T4i's is touch-sensitive) and if you move up to a more advanced model like the Canon EOS 7D$869.99 at Amazon or the Nikon D7100 you get better autofocus, more physical controls, and a larger pentaprism viewfinder. The bottom line is that features are similar at similar price points—Canon may have a slight edge in video autofocus with the T4i, but only if you use one of two available STM lenses, but the similar Nikon D5200 has a more advanced autofocus system and offers an optional Wi-Fi adapter.
    Nikon is alone in having a pair of cameras available that omit the optical low pass filter. Most professional medium format cameras skip this filter as well, as it reduces image sharpness. This comes at a risk of color moiré, an unwanted rainbow color pattern, when shooting certain fabrics or textures—but if that unwanted effect pops up in your images, it can be removed using tools in Lightroom and Photoshop. The full-frame D800E, which packs a 36-megapixel sensor (the highest resolution of any current Nikon or Canon SLR) removes the OLPF from its design, as does the company's flagship APS-C model, the 24-megapixel D7100.
    Lens Compatibility
    If you have an old 35mm Nikon or Canon camera lying around gathering dust, there's a chance that you'll be able to use your lenses on a D-SLR. When Canon moved from manual focus to autofocus in the 1980s it changed its lens mount, so you can't use manual focus lenses for FD mount cameras like the venerable Canon AE-1 on a Canon D-SLR. However, if you have a more recent Canon EOS 35mm film camera, any lenses that you own will mount and work on a Canon digital SLR.
    Nikon D-SLRs can use most Nikon lenses made after 1977, like the manual focus 50mm f/1.2 shown to the right, but there are a few exceptions. The Nikonians web site has a full compatibility chart, but of course a manual focus lens won't somehow gain the ability to autofocus on a newer camera. And if you're used to an old film camera, the field of view of your older lenses will be narrowed when mounted on an APS-C D-SLR. These lenses still capture the same amount of light, but since the sensor is physically smaller, information around it is not recorded. If you have an old SLR with a trusty 50mm standard-angle prime lens, it will act more like a short telephoto 75mm on an entry-level D-SLR.
    If you use modern lenses, the crop factor isn't a huge deal as many are now designed with the smaller sensors in mind. An 18mm focal length on a full-frame camera captures such a wide field of view that you'll want to be careful not to get your fingers in the frame, but mounting the same lens to an APS-C camera produces a more moderate field of view, akin to a 28mm lens on a full-frame body.
    Because of this, the kit lens that ships with your D-SLR doesn't cover the image circle of a 35mm film frame. Canon uses an EF-S designation for these APS-C lenses, while Nikon refers to them as DX. The key difference between the systems is that Canon EF-S lenses will only work with an APS-C camera; they will not fit on a full-frame body like the Canon EOS 6D$1,399.00 at Amazon (left). Nikon DX lenses can mount on a Nikon full-frame camera, like the D600$859.00 at mpb.com, in a special crop mode that simply uses a smaller area of the image sensor to capture a photo.
    If you do find yourself bitten by the photographic bug and want to upgrade to a full-frame body down the road, Nikon's system gives you more room to grow. The standard 18-55mm kit lens isn't anything special, and you'll likely want to replace it with a nicer zoom if your photographic interests elevate. The Canon EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS USM$829.00 at Amazon is an excellent lens that is priced at close to $1,200, but you won't be able to use it on a full-frame Canon camera. Nikon's similar 17-55mm AF-S DX Zoom-Nikkor 17-55mm f/2.8G IF-ED will work on an FX Nikon camera, but photos will be recorded at a reduced resolution and you'll still be limited to an approximate 25-80mm field of view.
    You can always future-proof yourself and simply buy full-frame lenses. Almost all of Canon's non-zooming lenses are all EF, and you can opt to buy high-quality EF zooms as well—although they'll take more money out of your pocket. A year ago this compatibility issue wasn't as important as it is today, but full-frame cameras are coming down in price to the point where more and more photographic enthusiasts are enjoying the benefits of a larger image sensor—which included better performance in low light and the ability to create an extremely shallow depth of field so that you get a very blurry background behind your subject. Right now the cost of entry is around $2,000, but I wouldn't be surprised if that figure decreases over the next few years.
    Hope that helps, it took me all of two minutes to put that expertise together for you.
    9 answers · Cameras · 2 days ago
  • Why are there no vhs players that are for your pc?

    Wouldn't it work? theres dvd players, floppy disk players, wouldn't someone have atleast made one?
    Wouldn't it work? theres dvd players, floppy disk players, wouldn't someone have atleast made one?
    6 answers · TiVO & DVRs · 1 day ago
  • Whats the value of this camera?

    Best answer: Shiloh, If you are a film photographer yourself or are interested in learning, Nikkormats are wonderful cameras because they are very cheap yet very well made, very capable and fun to use. I have been shooting for about 17 years and I have shot a number of my favorite photos and some published images using... show more
    Best answer: Shiloh,

    If you are a film photographer yourself or are interested in learning, Nikkormats are wonderful cameras because they are very cheap yet very well made, very capable and fun to use. I have been shooting for about 17 years and I have shot a number of my favorite photos and some published images using Nikkormat FTn's or FT2's.

    Nikkormat FT's are the cheapest, least desirable Nikkormat models. FTn's are the most common. FT2's and FT3's are preferred by many and so they command the highest prices. Nikkormat EL's are also rather popular but tend not to be very reliable.

    The model is listed just before the Serial Number on the back of the top plate. If you have an FTn, the N is not in front of the SN, but rather under the top plate light meter display.

    As others have pointed out, however, they do not sell for much money. I don't believe I've ever paid more than $50 for one but have refurbishment costs of up to $120 in each of mine. Only if you have an FT2 or FT3 that is 100% functional, as tested by an expert, not your personal opinion, and absolutely immaculate cosmetically will you be able to get maybe around $100 for one. Particularly if you have the original box.

    "All in very clean condition the owner took very good care of them"

    Many people THINK vintage cameras are in very clean condition but unless you are a very educated camera expert, this is actually a hard claim to make accurately because cameras, by nature, are usually kept very clean. So the difference between a common vintage camera and an immaculate one is very subtle.

    And the lenses that you have received with it are really not good examples, unfortunately.

    Assuming that the camera is reasonably clean and working, two lenses with it for $25 is a fine price, but you probably couldn't "flip" the same lot for much more if that was your plan.

    Best thing to do with this camera is to replace its light seals, pick up a Nikkor 50mm lens of your choosing and USE IT!

    If you invest a little time and money into using this Nikkormat, you will be rewarded with something really valuable, high quality, hand-crafted photographs.

    If you need help with this, please don't hesitate to email me at JohnnyMartyr@Hotmail.com.

    Otherwise, please be kind enough to choose a best answer!
    7 answers · Cameras · 2 days ago
  • My PC is ten years old. Should I change it?

    Best answer: It depends on your needs. You can still use it.
    Best answer: It depends on your needs. You can still use it.
    7 answers · PC · 1 day ago
  • Is it safe to have a pc mic above my xbox one?

    Best answer: Yes, safe.
    Best answer: Yes, safe.
    6 answers · Xbox · 2 days ago