• Should I pursue further legal action against my student loan?

    Hello! I graduated from a 4 year university this past May. I was on academic and athletic scholarship and was under the impression that I was not paying for my school because of all the scholarships. I began receiving emails in October 2018 from Great Lakes (loan company) saying that my first loan payment is due in... show more
    Hello! I graduated from a 4 year university this past May. I was on academic and athletic scholarship and was under the impression that I was not paying for my school because of all the scholarships. I began receiving emails in October 2018 from Great Lakes (loan company) saying that my first loan payment is due in a few months (Dec 2018). I had began receiving emails from Great Lakes back in 2014, but just thought it was a loan company trying to get me to take a loan out through them. Whenever I attempted to log in, it said no account found. I also had never even heard of Great Lakes and neither had my parents. Turns out, 4 separate loans totaling $27,000 were accumulating under my name. I had never, not once, received notification that these loans were being taken out or were re-occurring. I went back to the site, made an account, and logged in for the first time in 4 years to this surprise. I went back and checked the Master Promissory Note (MPN) and I did electronically sign it. Also, in my university's financial records, the loan is clearly stated for each semester. I just was not aware what it was. I am fine with paying back the loan, but I am pissed that this was a complete surprise and I never not ONCE received anything from Great Lakes making me aware of these loans. I didn't even know Great Lakes was the provider. My main question is: Do you think I should pursue further legal help regarding the lack of notice and disclosure of the loans?
    6 answers · 2 days ago
  • Do i need to report my income to FAFSA if I made under $10,000? I'm 29 and independent.?

    This is my senior year and for the FAFSA i'm reporting my 2017 income and also i'm older, 29 and only report my own income. In 2017 I made about $7500 total. One friend was telling me that you don't have to report that to them if you made under $10,000. Do I still need to report it and they'll count... show more
    This is my senior year and for the FAFSA i'm reporting my 2017 income and also i'm older, 29 and only report my own income. In 2017 I made about $7500 total. One friend was telling me that you don't have to report that to them if you made under $10,000. Do I still need to report it and they'll count it as making under and receive a good amount of Grant for my tuition or do I just report on the FAFSA that I made no income?
    4 answers · 3 days ago
  • Will my mother get an email notification if I add a school to my FAFSA?

    Best answer: When a change occurs on the FAFSA, notification is sent to the student's email. So, unless you used an email your mother has access to, she wouldn't receive the notice. However, in order to receive a financial aid package, you generally have to be accepted by the school. Which means you have to apply,... show more
    Best answer: When a change occurs on the FAFSA, notification is sent to the student's email. So, unless you used an email your mother has access to, she wouldn't receive the notice. However, in order to receive a financial aid package, you generally have to be accepted by the school. Which means you have to apply, and once you apply, you'll receive lots of contacts from that school, which greatly increases the chances that mom will find out. Even assuming she doesn't find out now, and you receive a financial aid award letter, what's the next step? How will you manage to attend this school and pay the bill without her knowing about it? It seems to me that it would make more sense to be upfront about it now. It's hard to think about being separated from your boyfriend, but you're mom's probably right: choosing a college just because it's closer to him isn't a great idea. College is a huge investment, and you should base your decision on factors like the quality of education you're going to get. Unless you're going to the same college and rooming together, you're really not going to see much of your boyfriend anyway, so what does it matter if you're 10 miles or 100 miles apart? If your relationship is meant to be, it will survive the separation. If not, then you might be glad you picked a college that had something else to offer.
    4 answers · 4 days ago
  • What did you do when you found out you couldn't afford nursing school?

    I recently got accepted into my schools nursing program for an associates degree. However, I cannot afford it. My parents cannot help and I cannot get a loan. I do not receive financial aid. I have been paying everything out of pocket. My parents say I should wait until I am 23 because I am considered an... show more
    I recently got accepted into my schools nursing program for an associates degree. However, I cannot afford it. My parents cannot help and I cannot get a loan. I do not receive financial aid. I have been paying everything out of pocket. My parents say I should wait until I am 23 because I am considered an "adult' and I could possibly get some aid. I am 20. I would have to wait three more years. They say I can always go back to school anytime. Have any you guys been in this situation? Did you apply for the next semester and just worked? Or did you do a lpn program and bridged to rn? Any advice?
    5 answers · 6 days ago
  • Please how do i get a scholarship?

    8 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Wha happens if i lie on fafsa? If they ask met if i have a bachelors and i say no when i do have one. I'm doing this to go back for another?

    Best answer: They'll likely just ask for the money back, as they don't usually prosecute. But then you're stuck with a bill you weren't planning on.
    Best answer: They'll likely just ask for the money back, as they don't usually prosecute. But then you're stuck with a bill you weren't planning on.
    7 answers · 3 weeks ago
  • Is it true that Florida does not offer financial aid to out of state students?

    I was told you have to live in the state of Florida for a year before you qualify for financial aid like a pell grant. Is that true?
    I was told you have to live in the state of Florida for a year before you qualify for financial aid like a pell grant. Is that true?
    6 answers · 4 weeks ago
  • How do I apply for financial aid (FAFSA) if my parents don’t file taxes?

    I’m currently a senior in high school and applying for college/fafsa, but my dad has never payed taxes since he works under the table. Is there a way around this situation and apply for financial aid regardless?
    I’m currently a senior in high school and applying for college/fafsa, but my dad has never payed taxes since he works under the table. Is there a way around this situation and apply for financial aid regardless?
    6 answers · 4 weeks ago
  • I only got $580 from financial aid how can i pay of the rest of my tuition?

    I applied to my local community college. But i only got $580. I still gotta pay $880 not inlcluding books. How do i pay off the rest?
    I applied to my local community college. But i only got $580. I still gotta pay $880 not inlcluding books. How do i pay off the rest?
    9 answers · 1 month ago
  • Had anyone of you dropped out of community college and later went back?

    I dropped out for 2 years and know im going back. Am i alone or have more people done this?
    I dropped out for 2 years and know im going back. Am i alone or have more people done this?
    7 answers · 1 month ago
  • Will my student loans really be forgiven after 20 years?

    Best answer: Theoretically it is possible to have a portion of your loans forgiven. But the reality is that it's not likely and could actually cost you more. In order to qualify for forgiveness of federal student loans, you have to be enrolled in certain income based payment plans that extend your loan term from the... show more
    Best answer: Theoretically it is possible to have a portion of your loans forgiven. But the reality is that it's not likely and could actually cost you more. In order to qualify for forgiveness of federal student loans, you have to be enrolled in certain income based payment plans that extend your loan term from the standard 10 years to 20-25 years. You have to make payments under that plan for the entire time, so you won't get the whole loan forgiven--only the portion that remains if it isn't paid off at the end of the term. The hook is that if you make all those payments, most (if not all) of the loan will be paid off by then. In the meantime, while you are making those reduced payments, interest is still accruing on the loan and your debt is actually increasing. So, it's likely that if anything gets forgiven, it will be just a portion of all that interest that you wouldn't have had in the first place if you had paid the loan off in the standard 10 year term. There are also some other issues to be considered. Since you only qualify for forgiveness if you are in an income driven repayment plan, you have to reapply every year based on your current income at that time. Most people's income increases over 20 years, and if it does, you might not qualify to continue in the program and have to go back into the standard 10 year payment plan.
    As a result, you no longer qualify for forgiveness, and your debt is also larger because you have all that extra interest. If you do remain in the program for the full time and end up having some of your debt forgiven, the amount that you have forgiven is considered taxable income and you'll get socked with a huge tax bill in the year that the forgiveness occurs. It the amount forgiven is substantial, that tax bill can be thousands of dollars, and the IRS isn't going to give you 20 years to pay it off. If your income at that point is low enough to still be in the program, that tax bill can be a huge burden. Another problem: having this long term debt can affect your credit for the next 20 years and make it more difficult to use your credit to take steps that build wealth, such as purchasing a home or qualifying for lower interest credit cards and car loans. In the long run, that can cost you a lot more than the amount that would be forgiven. Keep in mind that the income driven repayment plans haven't been around very long, and the first cohort of students that would be eligible for forgiveness hasn't reached the 20 year mark yet, so there's no track record for what percentage of borrowers who are in these programs will actually have some of their debt forgiven. If the record for the Public Service Forgiveness Program is any indication, very few will qualify. That program has a 10 year term, and the first cohort of borrowers who might qualify for it just reached that point a year ago. As of Sept, 2018, about 99% of applications have been rejected and out of 28,000 applications, only 96 have been approved and have actually had loans forgiven. The biggest problem seems to be that the requirements for it are complicated and very few applicants understood them well enough to meet every requirement throughout the 10 year period, so in the end, they were disqualified. This does not bode well for the other loan forgiveness programs, but it's too soon to tell for sure. If you're in a profession where the wages are very low and you don't expect to make any progress over the next 20 years, then it might make sense to participate in the program, but for most people, you'll probably come out further ahead it you work to increase your income and just pay off the loans sooner. You can find general information about federal student loan forgiveness programs at https://studentaid.gov--but it don't expect to find information about the pitfalls of the programs there.
    36 answers · 1 month ago
  • If i'm applying for a college and i'm not working am I automatically entitled to some kind of funding from them?

    like travel etc? The problem is I don't want them knowing how much money I have in my bank account, will they require a bank statement which will show my balance?
    like travel etc? The problem is I don't want them knowing how much money I have in my bank account, will they require a bank statement which will show my balance?
    10 answers · 1 month ago
  • Are there any good grants for single mothers to get a car?

    Best answer: If you are on public assistance, some states have programs to match people up with dependable used cars - speak to your social worker.
    Best answer: If you are on public assistance, some states have programs to match people up with dependable used cars - speak to your social worker.
    4 answers · 4 weeks ago
  • Student loans?

    Best answer: Or, you could join the military for 4 years and contribute to the GI Bill. And upon your honorable discharge you would have some college money you would never have to pay back. You could also get the right job in the military (most likely easiest if you join the Air Force) and you might be able to go to school part... show more
    Best answer: Or, you could join the military for 4 years and contribute to the GI Bill. And upon your honorable discharge you would have some college money you would never have to pay back. You could also get the right job in the military (most likely easiest if you join the Air Force) and you might be able to go to school part time and have the military pay for that while you're enlisted.
    4 answers · 1 month ago
  • Do you guys know what that term is called when elder people gets free money from the government every month?

    i've been recently researching about how much money elders 65+ get every month from the government. I don't know what its called but when i searched up free money for elders, it doesn't give me any results i wanted. I want to find out how much Canada gives to its elders compared to the U.S. What is the... show more
    i've been recently researching about how much money elders 65+ get every month from the government. I don't know what its called but when i searched up free money for elders, it doesn't give me any results i wanted. I want to find out how much Canada gives to its elders compared to the U.S. What is the name of that money? is it elder grants or something?
    7 answers · 1 month ago
  • Why have only 300 applications out of the 30,000 for public service loan forgiveness been approved for discharge?

    Best answer: Some of the denials are due to paperwork errors. Some are due to ineligible repayment plans. Some are due to irregular repayment which disqualifies them. Some are due to the mistaken belief that ANY public service qualifies the borrower.
    Best answer: Some of the denials are due to paperwork errors. Some are due to ineligible repayment plans. Some are due to irregular repayment which disqualifies them. Some are due to the mistaken belief that ANY public service qualifies the borrower.
    4 answers · 1 month ago