• Why is the Fuselage of a jet aeroplane Shaped like a Giant Penis?

    Best answer: To fit with the front being called the cockpit.
    Best answer: To fit with the front being called the cockpit.
    9 answers · 2 days ago
  • How to become an airline pilot?

    I want to become an airline pilot, do any of you know how to or the steps / process?
    I want to become an airline pilot, do any of you know how to or the steps / process?
    7 answers · 14 hours ago
  • Is it true chemtrails are caused by commercial airplanes and not government planes?

    Best answer: Yes... You are a prime example that chemtrails DO exist. The ones over your city contain chemicals that make people STUPID. You obviously got a snoot full.
    Best answer: Yes... You are a prime example that chemtrails DO exist. The ones over your city contain chemicals that make people STUPID. You obviously got a snoot full.
    15 answers · 5 days ago
  • Is university required to be an airline pilot?

    I want to be an airline pilot but I'm not interested in attending a university I just want a 4 year degree from a community college. Will I have to attend a university instead?
    I want to be an airline pilot but I'm not interested in attending a university I just want a 4 year degree from a community college. Will I have to attend a university instead?
    6 answers · 4 days ago
  • How do A/C ground handlers deal with the heat in really hot climates?

    Best answer: Nobody worries about ground crews. We have been expendable since the start of the airline industry. Only union rules, enforced by the threat of a strike, give us any respite from the elements, or hazards on the flight line. We are often "shamed" into working beyond levels of heat, cold, and time, that are... show more
    Best answer: Nobody worries about ground crews. We have been expendable since the start of the airline industry. Only union rules, enforced by the threat of a strike, give us any respite from the elements, or hazards on the flight line. We are often "shamed" into working beyond levels of heat, cold, and time, that are healthy for us. Usually, when someone applies for one of these jobs, they are familiar with the weather conditions they will be working in, and know what precautions to take, to survive.
    6 answers · 5 days ago
  • During the 1910s, why did people go to France for flight training.......?

    And not to the United States. The airplane was invented in the US in 1903 and so we are pretty much more advanced in the field of aviation than the French are...
    And not to the United States. The airplane was invented in the US in 1903 and so we are pretty much more advanced in the field of aviation than the French are...
    12 answers · 1 week ago
  • How much more expense does a dark paint job on a plane cost?

    Best answer: Paint is paint. It doesn't cost any more to paint an airplane in a dark color than it does to paint it white. The PROBLEM comes when an airplane is left parked and tied down on an open ramp, and the sun beats down on that dark surface all day long. It causes a serious heat build up inside the fuselage and... show more
    Best answer: Paint is paint. It doesn't cost any more to paint an airplane in a dark color than it does to paint it white. The PROBLEM comes when an airplane is left parked and tied down on an open ramp, and the sun beats down on that dark surface all day long. It causes a serious heat build up inside the fuselage and wings, and temperatures could get high enough to cause some deterioration of internal components. This is especially true of composite (plastic) materials and some sensitive electronics. The dark painted airplane you saw may look "cool" but it needs to be stored under cover when not in use.
    7 answers · 1 week ago
  • Will Japan airlines cancel replace their subsonic planes with order of boom supersonic planes?

    Best answer: $10 million is a tiny investment for a billion-dollar company and wouldn't buy a single aircraft. We told you before, supersonic travel will be a niche market for the wealthy and will not take over mainstream air travel, and certainly not within the next 20 years. You can stop asking the same old tired... show more
    Best answer: $10 million is a tiny investment for a billion-dollar company and wouldn't buy a single aircraft.

    We told you before, supersonic travel will be a niche market for the wealthy and will not take over mainstream air travel, and certainly not within the next 20 years.

    You can stop asking the same old tired questions. Go take your OCD / ADHD meds and calm down.
    6 answers · 7 days ago
  • Can you go to school while being an airline pilot simultaneously?

    Best answer: If you have enough free time.
    Best answer: If you have enough free time.
    5 answers · 1 week ago
  • What frequencies do commercial airliners use to navigate with?

    Best answer: "What frequencies do commercial airliners use to navigate with?" Primarily by GPS (Global Positioning System) satellite receivers at around 1.5 gigahertz, and VHF radios for VOR and ILS navigation, which are signals broadcast from ground stations between 108.00 to 117.95 megahertz. "Could those... show more
    Best answer: "What frequencies do commercial airliners use to navigate with?"

    Primarily by GPS (Global Positioning System) satellite receivers at around 1.5 gigahertz, and VHF radios for VOR and ILS navigation, which are signals broadcast from ground stations between 108.00 to 117.95 megahertz.

    "Could those frequencies be hacked?"

    Yes, since the meaning of "hacking" includes accessing another system with the intent to corrupt or supply false data. With ground stations like VOR and ILS, there is no software to hack, but a person could jam the frequencies and hence corrupt the signal. In most cases this wouldn't degrade the navigation performance of the aircraft... it would disregard the signal as unusable and simply auto-tune to another reliable VOR signal, and use updated position data from its onboard inertial reference units. A corrupted ILS glideslope or localizer signal on approach to landing however would be a more serious situation, and if the crew truly "did nothing" like executing a missed approach, they could conceivably fly the aircraft into the ground or an obstacle in low visibility conditions.

    Hacking a GPS system is a lot harder to do, especially from the ground. A cyber-geek passenger with a laptop and satellite connection (and the right software) could "spoof" the plane's GPS by giving it false information, but the aircraft would definitely trigger a position error, nav source, or GPS alert since the other navigation systems would detect the inconsistencies in position data. If the pilots ignored the alerts and failed to isolate the GPS from the other nav systems, it's possible the airplane could be flown off course. Theoretically, of course.

    "Could someone on the ground take control and land the plane somewhere?"

    No way. An airplane's autopilot, flight control, and flight management computers cannot be hacked, period. Whereas it's possible to spoof navigation signals and cause some confusion, it is NOT possible to send flight control commands from an external device, into an aircraft's internal computers. There is no antenna or wireless access point in the system to communicate with some mobile device.
    3 answers · 1 week ago
  • If US Airways 1549 had four engines it probably wouldn't need to ditch?

    Best answer: Possibly, but the flight had the misfortune of encountering a flock of geese that spanned the entire width of the wings, at least from engine to engine. The odds would have been about the same.
    Best answer: Possibly, but the flight had the misfortune of encountering a flock of geese that spanned the entire width of the wings, at least from engine to engine. The odds would have been about the same.
    10 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Est-ce que le Canada devrait s' armer encore plus pour devenir une méga puissance militaire?
  • Will nasa's supersonic planes change the way we travel in 2021?

    Best answer: Airlines are in business to make money. Speed is expensive. It takes more energy to go faster. Even if you have, in some way, suspended the physics that cause a damaging high pressure wave off the front of a supersonic object, the fuel cost alone makes a supersonic transport plane a financial liability. Comfort,... show more
    Best answer: Airlines are in business to make money. Speed is expensive. It takes more energy to go faster. Even if you have, in some way, suspended the physics that cause a damaging high pressure wave off the front of a supersonic object, the fuel cost alone makes a supersonic transport plane a financial liability. Comfort, quiet, and economical, outsells speed.
    10 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • If all aircraft above FL180 set altimeter to 29.92 how do they know their actual altitude MSL, or AGL?

    Best answer: They don't care how high they actually are above sea level - that's not a relevant bit of information. It makes no difference to them if they are at 20,580 ft MSL instead of 21,000 MSL. As long as you are above AGL, how far above AGL is also of limited value during cruise. If you are operating... show more
    Best answer: They don't care how high they actually are above sea level - that's not a relevant bit of information. It makes no difference to them if they are at 20,580 ft MSL instead of 21,000 MSL.
    As long as you are above AGL, how far above AGL is also of limited value during cruise.

    If you are operating above18,000 feet, you are also operating under IFR, and IFR provides altitude minimums for the specific route or area you are in. If you are above the minimum altitude on a published jetway you will clear any terrain in the area safely. even over mountains.


    It's worth noting that all performance figures are based on a standard pressure altitude and a standard temperature. With the altimeter set to the standard pressure, you only have to account for temperature variations.
    4 answers · 1 week ago
  • In 1994 China Airlines flight 140, an Airbus A300 crashed on approach to Nagoya Airport in Japan.?

    My question is, the crash happened because the pilots inadvertantly pushed the Take-off go-around around switch, how the heck do you accidentally push that button? That's a button that should be handled with great caution. Also did they just push it without looking? How can you not realize you pushed that button?
    My question is, the crash happened because the pilots inadvertantly pushed the Take-off go-around around switch, how the heck do you accidentally push that button? That's a button that should be handled with great caution. Also did they just push it without looking? How can you not realize you pushed that button?
    5 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • I got a questions, does the NTSB get involved with a crash involving Airbus?in another country, but lets say it s a U.S. based airline.?

    I m trying to know if the NTSB would still investigate an Airbus crash in another country, if it was the Airbus aircraft was operating for a United States based airline. I know they would if it was a Boeing aircraft (Since it s american made)
    I m trying to know if the NTSB would still investigate an Airbus crash in another country, if it was the Airbus aircraft was operating for a United States based airline. I know they would if it was a Boeing aircraft (Since it s american made)
    4 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • What is the future of airliners?

    Best answer: Commercial aircraft take between 2-5 years (sometimes more) to design, test, and put the first ones of a new model into service. The new model generally remains in production for 20-40 years. Sometimes they'll get a design overhaul such as new engines and other upgrades that extend its lifecyle without... show more
    Best answer: Commercial aircraft take between 2-5 years (sometimes more) to design, test, and put the first ones of a new model into service.

    The new model generally remains in production for 20-40 years. Sometimes they'll get a design overhaul such as new engines and other upgrades that extend its lifecyle without changing the overall appearance.

    Aircraft, once built, generally remain in service for 20-40 years.

    So there's very little chance of any significant change in the next 10 years.

    Boeing and Airbus have both overhauled their fleets in the last 10+ years.

    Airbus has put new engines and design upgrades on the A320 and A330 aircraft, and the A350 and A380 are relatively new designs.

    Boeing has done new engines and design upgrades on the 737, 747, and 777, with the 787 being a relatively new design. They are also working on development of a new aircraft. There aren't many official details available but it looks like it will be a small/mid size wide body in the typical design of a long round(ish) tube with wings and one engine on each wing. It will use carbon fiber instead of aluminum and will probably incorporate a lot of advanced technology, but from a distance to the average person it will look like just another flying tube with wings.

    Supersonic commercial air travel may happen again someday, but there are tons of challenges to overcome and even if we start seeing supersonic jets it will be a long, long time before they completely replace the subsonic jets you see today. It will probably be only a niche market for long distance, first class service.
    5 answers · 2 weeks ago