• Why do airplanes have turbine engines?

    18 answers · 6 days ago
  • Is there an age when one is too old to learn flying an airplane from scratch?

    is it too old for someone in their 50s or 60s to start from the scratch toward getting a private pilot license?
    is it too old for someone in their 50s or 60s to start from the scratch toward getting a private pilot license?
    12 answers · 6 days ago
  • Don't you think too many private planes are crashing in the state of California?

    Best answer: Three reasons: --Number of flights. Quite high in this state. I live under the busiest private and commercial air corridor in the nation. Los Angeles to San Diego. I see one to four planes over my house at any time, any day, night until midnight. --Weather. Coastal fog, high winds, snow, thunderstorms in... show more
    Best answer: Three reasons:
    --Number of flights. Quite high in this state. I live under the busiest private and commercial air corridor in the nation. Los Angeles to San Diego. I see one to four planes over my house at any time, any day, night until midnight.
    --Weather. Coastal fog, high winds, snow, thunderstorms in California, just like most other places, but frequent and varied because of the large area (third biggest state by area).
    --Terrain. Mountain chains that create updrafts, turbulence, clouds.
    11 answers · 7 days ago
  • Is there actually flames (fire) inside the airplane engine when it's running?

    Best answer: Yes, inside the burner cans in the combustion section of any turbine engine, there is a constant flame burning the fuel as it is injected into the burner can. It is a very controlled flame. Just enough fuel to be able to burn with the available oxygen. Air is directed in a manner to keep the flame from actually... show more
    Best answer: Yes, inside the burner cans in the combustion section of any turbine engine, there is a constant flame burning the fuel as it is injected into the burner can.
    It is a very controlled flame. Just enough fuel to be able to burn with the available oxygen. Air is directed in a manner to keep the flame from actually touching the metal of the can.
    Oil is used to lubricate the internal moving parts of the engine. Without lubrication, you would have metal on metal, building friction and heat to the point the metal will melt and the engine seize.
    16 answers · 1 week ago
  • Have you ever farted in church?

    Best answer: I'm the reason they call it a "PEW".
    Best answer: I'm the reason they call it a "PEW".
    5 answers · 6 days ago
  • Will airlines have a pilot shortage?

    Best answer: That's only a myth. Many people got their Commercial license and can't find a job in aviation. The idea of a pilot shortage is a long time myth.
    Best answer: That's only a myth. Many people got their Commercial license and can't find a job in aviation. The idea of a pilot shortage is a long time myth.
    4 answers · 1 week ago
  • Can someone go to prison if they fly a drone near an airport and the drone crashes into a plane?

    Even though that tiny piece of plastic poses absolutely no threat to jet liners
    Even though that tiny piece of plastic poses absolutely no threat to jet liners
    29 answers · 3 weeks ago
  • Why do we usually use the thrust setting next to the TOGA ?

    As it shows in the below pic Why do we usually use the thrust setting next to the TOGA ? I mean the F50? https://ibb.co/ggZ8Op
    As it shows in the below pic Why do we usually use the thrust setting next to the TOGA ? I mean the F50? https://ibb.co/ggZ8Op
    5 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • How much is a Boeing 767?

    9 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • What is your Vehicle of Choice?

    Best answer: HoverCraft RocketShip equipped with more FirePower than the "most powerful" human nations.

    Ommm
    Best answer: HoverCraft RocketShip equipped with more FirePower than the "most powerful" human nations.

    Ommm
    13 answers · 3 weeks ago
  • What do you think ruined the airline industry?

    Best answer: I didn't realize it was ruined. There are still plenty of people flying every day, out of the airport in my town.
    Best answer: I didn't realize it was ruined. There are still plenty of people flying every day, out of the airport in my town.
    18 answers · 3 weeks ago
  • Aviation Regulations?

    Assuming we are day vfr and one of the position indicator lights was no longer on the airplane(as in it fell off in flight or such). Would the airplane still be airworthy assuming you abide by 91.213? An instructor once told me in this scenario that it would not be airworthy, “as we just can’t have parts falling... show more
    Assuming we are day vfr and one of the position indicator lights was no longer on the airplane(as in it fell off in flight or such). Would the airplane still be airworthy assuming you abide by 91.213? An instructor once told me in this scenario that it would not be airworthy, “as we just can’t have parts falling off an airplane.” After reviewing the regulations, it’s not required for day vfr(91.205) and it’s not on the equipment list in the poh and we meet the requirements of 91.213. It leads me to believe it is airworthy. Any ideas on whether or not the airplane would be airworthy? Thanks
    5 answers · 3 weeks ago
  • Was airline deregulation good or bad? And Why?

    Best answer: It depends... If you were one of the few that could afford to fly before deregulation, it was bad. If you think a $79 cramped seat on Allegent or Spirit is still far better than a 12 hour car ride, it was good. If you live in a market that supports enough traffic to bring in multiple airline, it's a good... show more
    Best answer: It depends... If you were one of the few that could afford to fly before deregulation, it was bad. If you think a $79 cramped seat on Allegent or Spirit is still far better than a 12 hour car ride, it was good.
    If you live in a market that supports enough traffic to bring in multiple airline, it's a good thing, since competition keeps the price down. If you are in a smaller city, it's not good, since the airlines were required to provide service to small cities.

    If you are a pilot or flight attendant, it's a mixed bag: there are more flights, and there for more jobs, but with price competition the slim profit margins reduced pay and made companies less stable, so pensions are always at risk.
    7 answers · 3 weeks ago
  • When to use ODP or SID?

    Best answer: First off, you should be clear that ODPs and SIDs are both obstacle departure procedures. Second, ODPs aren’t assigned by ATC. Unless certain aspects of it are specified in the IFR clearance, compliance with an ODP is not mandatory, but it is wise and ATC pretty much expects you to adhere to them. Third,... show more
    Best answer: First off, you should be clear that ODPs and SIDs are both obstacle departure procedures.

    Second, ODPs aren’t assigned by ATC. Unless certain aspects of it are specified in the IFR clearance, compliance with an ODP is not mandatory, but it is wise and ATC pretty much expects you to adhere to them.

    Third, compliance with a SID is mandatory. If you are going to use a SID, you usually specify it in the flight plan you file along with the transition you want. Sometimes, if ATC cannot comply with your requested flight plan, they will give a revised clearance specifying the SID they want you to use. Never accept a SID unless you are sure that you can comply with its requirements.

    Now, This is just a generalization, but ODPs are designed to accommodate the most types of aircraft possible in terms of equipment and performance, or the greatest variation in routing options after departure, while SIDs are generally more suited to higher performance aircraft with more sophisticated navigation gear. Quite often you will find that SIDs require climb or speed performance only found in high performance piston powered, cabin-class twins, turboprops and jets, and some are restricted to jets only. And, SID's are more likely to restrict which runways can be used for departure.

    Quite often you will also find that SID's are structured to provide easier transition to high altitude routes than low altitude routes, again, favoring high performance aircraft. Depending on the airport and the volume of traffic, lower performance aircraft might be discouraged from using SIDs, and at some of these airports I've found that a clearance with a SID won't be issued even if you file for one if you're flying something like a Cessna 182..

    That said, at some airports, such as where I fly IFR departures anywhere from 10 to 40 times per week, there isn't an OPD option because of mountainous terrain. You have to use the SID and you have to use an airplane that can meet the requirements. There are only two SIDs available and one of them is a "special" requiring the crew to obtain special training and approval to fly it. Both require VFR departure conditions if a certain runway is used.

    The bottom line is that you have to become aware of what's appropriate at a given airport by reading all the fine print on the procedures available, as well as departure restrictions or preferences shown on AFD notes, and you should be aware of any preferred routes you should use in high density airspace such as around Los Angeles. Many towers and ATC facilities even publish helpful guides to local operations.
    4 answers · 3 weeks ago
  • What does the pilots do about the gremlins on the airplanes before taking off?

    Best answer: Certainly Every airline has its own, highly-trained gremlin inspectors, who can be supplemented by the airport's staff of auxiliary gremlin hunters. However, all pilots and cabin crew must themselves undergo gremlin-trapping and killing training, just in case some particularly clever and canny gremlin manages... show more
    Best answer: Certainly Every airline has its own, highly-trained gremlin inspectors, who can be supplemented by the airport's staff of auxiliary gremlin hunters. However, all pilots and cabin crew must themselves undergo gremlin-trapping and killing training, just in case some particularly clever and canny gremlin manages to elude the professionals during a pre-flight inspection. It happens.
    8 answers · 3 weeks ago
  • What does CLOSED and LATCHED mean in A320?

    Hello One of the things that we should inspect for walk around inspection in A320 is the fan cowl door. It should be CLOSED and LATCHED. My question is what is the difference between closed and latched?
    Hello One of the things that we should inspect for walk around inspection in A320 is the fan cowl door. It should be CLOSED and LATCHED. My question is what is the difference between closed and latched?
    9 answers · 4 weeks ago
  • Does anyone feel a sensation of heat when some aircraft fly overhead?

    Best answer: Yes, when they are only about 40-60 feet above me.
    Best answer: Yes, when they are only about 40-60 feet above me.
    5 answers · 4 weeks ago
  • My retiring dad has always dreamed of getting his pilot’s licence but has epilepsy. How could he still get involved in aviation?

    He tried fora pilots licence in his 20s but was diagnosed with epilepsy a few years ago
    He tried fora pilots licence in his 20s but was diagnosed with epilepsy a few years ago
    13 answers · 1 month ago