Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Politics & GovernmentLaw & Ethics · 2 months ago

Would it be legal for an employer to require a $1000 deposit to be hired ?

And the deposit returned after 1 year of employment. And if the employee quits before the 1 year, they lose the deposit. 

Update:

Basically to prevent people from abusing the training process for free training and money

8 Answers

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  • 2 months ago

    That is not legal.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    It would be by contract agreed to by both parties.  I've seen something similar called a "background search" fee.  The fee is forfeited if the employee quits (or is fired for cause) in the first six months, returned to the employee after 6 months on the job.

    There is nothing illegal in this - the legal wording is important (obviously).

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  • 2 months ago

    Hell no and if you know somebody that's doing that report them to the wage and hour division it's against the law to take a deposit to give somebody a job unless you guarantee them in writing that they will have a job! This is a scam that some people are doing in order to extort money off of other people they promised them a wonderful job are they tell them they have to give $1,000 deposit because of tools and training that will be invested in them and then after a month or two they lay them off or fire them. And keep their deposit. Don't fall for it report them.

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  • Bort
    Lv 6
    2 months ago

    Anyone, including employers, can create a contract that says and/or requires anything. Even if what it's terms are are not legal. If a person signs it, they agree to it.

    It is the persons decision whether to sign and agree to a contract or not. If you don't agree to it, don't sign it and walk out.

    • Nuff Sed
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      Sure, but illegal terms in a contract are not (by definition) enforceable in court.

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  • 2 months ago

    Years ago, I got a CDL drivers license for free. The catch was I had to drive a school bus in a small, ghetto city. Very bad children, all minorities. They paid the current minimum wage for 6 months, $6.75 at the time in NY. If I left earlier than six months, I owed $250 for the training. This was the contract. 

    The day I finished 6 months they offered me $8.00 per hour to stay. It was 30 hours per week with sports at night/Saturday. It took all your time for $240 per week. No thanks. 

    I got a job as a transit bus driver about an hour away the very next day. 6am to 10am, then 3pm to 7pm. $9.25 per hour, 40 hours per week, ok benefits. $5 for the 5 hour down time too. $395 per week. Easy choice. The training fee was legal.

    • random_man
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      What you describe is legal, but that's different than requiring a $1,000 deposit. My current employer is paying for me to get a master's degree, and in return I had to sign a contract that I must stay at least 2 years or pay it back. (Similar to your scenario). You didn't pay a training fee. 

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  • Pearl
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    i dont think so, but i think if someone hires you they should pay you the thousand dollars and let you keep it if they fire you

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  • 2 months ago

    At least in the United States, no, it would not be legal. What would be legal, and better from an employee morale standpoint, would be a retention bonus of whatever amount given at the 1-year mark. If the employee doesn't stay they don't get it. 

    Source(s): former employer
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  • 2 months ago

    Probably

    Workers get well shafted in the USA!

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