Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsZoology · 1 month ago

how fast do domesticated animal traits disappear in the wild?

the difference between wild and feral is a feral animal is a 'wild' domesticated animal, or the descendants of domesticated animals that are now 'wild' again. a decent ammount of the domestication is the selective breeding to promote traits WE want, like fancy coloring on rats/mice. wild house mice and brown rats are brown and drab and dull, and i hear that if left to breed naturally, they will eventually loose their fancy coloring. how many generations of fancy rodents until they are no longer fancy rodents, just unidentifiable feral brown ones, reverted back to their natural state?

3 Answers

Relevance
  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Animals living in the wild are subject to natural selection. They have to be able to find food, and to escape predators. Fancy traits that are selectively bred by humans, such as tameness, colors that stand out in the wild, are quickly eliminated. When a feral animal dies before reproducing, its genes will be lost.

    Nevertheless, sometimes feral animals, such as horses and donkeys, may maintain their fancy colors. White horses, for example, continue to exist among mustangs, which are feral horses in the United States. That may be because one of their main predators, the mountain lion, has been endangered for decades. Therefore it is certainly possible that in the future, mountain lions may eliminate white colored horses since they are so much easier to spot in the wild.

  • Zirp
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    that depends on the great genetic lottery, assuming the domestic animals interbreed with their wild counterparts instead of just with themselves.

    Genetics come in bundles called chromosomes, and we mammals pass on just half our chromosomes to a child we make. the child's other half comes from its other parent.

    You cannot pass on what you don't "carry"

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    I don't know about mice but nice plump pink domestic pigs will revert to a black, long haired, huge Razorback with tusks in just a few generations..

Still have questions? Get answers by asking now.